PDA

View Full Version : Cowardliness and Emotional Control.


Silver_Panther
06-28-2008, 18:04
I used the search button, but couldn't find any detailed info sorry if I missed stuff. :confused:

Purpose of thread is similar to
NousDefionsDoc's thread on mind set.

I am not likely to ever be linked to SF in anyway other then
this form.:boohoo
But perhaps the words of wisdom shared by the members will
help real candidates.:D

I am looking for general info on....
Controlling your emotions.
Over coming cowardliness.
Controlling adrenaline rush.

Are all the QPs a breed of men who started out as braver than your average man, Or is courage in the face of the enemy(what ever it may be) something a QP developed? If it can be developed, how?:lifter

Jack Moroney (RIP)
06-28-2008, 20:55
Controlling one's emotions is a matter of maturity. Dealing with lack of physical courage is a matter of becoming competent in your necessary skill sets, having confidence in your training, knowing your strengths and weaknesses and dealing with them. Dealing with a lack of moral courage is a matter of a personality flaw for which there is no cure-unless you want to become a politician and become adept at talking out of both side of your mouth. I am not sure you want to deal with the adrenalin rush as much as recognize the symptoms and how you react to it so you can act in a rationale rather than a haphazard manner and that comes with experience and pushing envelope in a training situation before you put other folks at risk. Mastering how you react in these situations will allow you to exercise intelligent intiative vice just reacting as if you were following some damn immediate action drill.

Silver_Panther
06-28-2008, 21:09
Controlling one's emotions is a matter of maturity. Dealing with lack of physical courage is a matter of becoming competent in your necessary skill sets, having confidence in your training, knowing your strengths and weaknesses and dealing with them. Dealing with a lack of moral courage is a matter of a personality flaw for which there is no cure-unless you want to become a politician and become adept at talking out of both side of your mouth. I am not sure you want to deal with the adrenalin rush as much as recognize the symptoms and how you react to it so you can act in a rationale rather than a haphazard manner and that comes with experience and pushing envelope in a training situation before you put other folks at risk. Mastering how you react in these situations will allow you to exercise intelligent intiative vice just reacting as if you were following some damn immediate action drill.

Physical courage and Moral courage....
Can you please explain the two more?

The Reaper
06-28-2008, 21:16
Why?

Of what possible relevance are these questions to you?

TR

Silver_Panther
06-28-2008, 21:33
Why?

Of what possible relevance are these questions to you?

TR


1. Emotional Control.

Learning strategies for this would help
Improve every aspect of my life.
I seem to get confused on when its smart in life to bite my tongue or when to bare my teeth...

2. Overcoming Cowardliness

Sometimes I feel I take the cowards route or easy route to much
Just looking for ways to start small and build up.

3. Controlling Adrenaline Rush.

self defence, prevention of over reaction or no action

Jack Moroney (RIP)
06-29-2008, 06:34
Physical courage and Moral courage....
Can you please explain the two more?

Physical courage requires an physical act on your part to deal with situations that threaten you, those around you, or those for whom you are responsible.

Moral courage is standing up for your beliefs and doing the right thing based on the values, mores, and tenets that make you who you are regardless of the personal pressures put on you to do something else that might benefit you personally or keep you out of a unfavorable light in the eyes of those who hold sway over you. This has much to do with personal and professional integrity.

In my book, moral courage is the more important of the two because it takes forethought and deliberate action based on who you are where you know exactly what the outcome is likely to be. It also provides a measure of consistency for those for whom you are charged to lead. Your soldiers always, always, need to know where you stand. While physical courage is important, it is often a result of action/reaction brought about by situations under which you have no control, that often are based on immediate reaction polished by training, peer pressure, fight or flight stimuli, or fear of failure. It is not always deliberate, although the outcome is usually positive-if you succeed. In many situations the aftermath is one of, "Damn, I don't believe what just happened" with a little, or a lot, of anxiety added to the mix. Both are necessary traits for a soldier/leader. Unfortunately for some, moral courage is often most easily gauged by someone's day to day actions while physical courage is only able to be measured after the fact and then is not necessarily a consistent trait because every situation is different. This is one reason why your training never stops as you prepare to deal with ever increasing uncertainties by honing and adding to your skills as you gather information/intelligence on the mindset of those against whom you will eventually have to stand and the environments in which you will operate.

greenberetTFS
08-22-2008, 16:04
Physical courage requires an physical act on your part to deal with situations that threaten you, those around you, or those for whom you are responsible.

Moral courage is standing up for your beliefs and doing the right thing based on the values, mores, and tenets that make you who you are regardless of the personal pressures put on you to do something else that might benefit you personally or keep you out of a unfavorable light in the eyes of those who hold sway over you. This has much to do with personal and professional integrity.

In my book, moral courage is the more important of the two because it takes forethought and deliberate action based on who you are where you know exactly what the outcome is likely to be. It also provides a measure of consistency for those for whom you are charged to lead. Your soldiers always, always, need to know where you stand. While physical courage is important, it is often a result of action/reaction brought about by situations under which you have no control, that often are based on immediate reaction polished by training, peer pressure, fight or flight stimuli, or fear of failure. It is not always deliberate, although the outcome is usually positive-if you succeed. In many situations the aftermath is one of, "Damn, I don't believe what just happened" with a little, or a lot, of anxiety added to the mix. Both are necessary traits for a soldier/leader. Unfortunately for some, moral courage is often most easily gauged by someone's day to day actions while physical courage is only able to be measured after the fact and then is not necessarily a consistent trait because every situation is different. This is one reason why your training never stops as you prepare to deal with ever increasing uncertainties by honing and adding to your skills as you gather information/intelligence on the mindset of those against whom you will eventually have to stand and the environments in which you will operate.

Sir,

I stumbled across this post and saw you have written a book....I'm a collector of SF military books and wondered if it's still in print and who is the publisher...Do you know if it's still available?

GB TFS

Chris Cram
08-22-2008, 16:45
Sir,

I stumbled across this post and saw you have written a book....I'm a collector of SF military books and wondered if it's still in print and who is the publisher...Do you know if it's still available?

GB TFS

I suspect he was speaking figuratively. But if it does exist formally, in a white paper or such, I think it would be a worth while read.

Physical courage and Moral courage....
Can you please explain the two more?

Since this question was asked, it seems that these concepts are not as generally understood as we may think they should be.
I believe these are subjects that should be taught by word and dead, from father to son.
(parent to child):D IMHO

Jack Moroney (RIP)
08-22-2008, 19:51
Sir,

I stumbled across this post and saw you have written a book....I'm a collector of SF military books and wondered if it's still in print and who is the publisher...Do you know if it's still available?

GB TFS

I was speaking figuratively. Most of what I would have to put in a book would best be done by those more talented and wiser than I.

Ambush Master
08-22-2008, 20:11
In my book, moral courage is the more important of the two because it takes forethought and deliberate action based on who you are where you know exactly what the outcome is likely to be.

What he's saying is "In my Book" = "In My Opinion" It's all a matter of context.


Take care.
Martin

Mike
09-09-2008, 16:19
I think you are born with it, or at least end up with it as a result of your formulative years.
You spend the rest of your life looking on in amazement at the weak links who don't seem to have it.

Toaster
11-14-2013, 07:53
Is there a difference in fighting ability/spirit of married and single Soldiers?

I recently had the honor of spending some time with a WWII, Korean, and Vietnam CIB recipient who was a glider and senior parachutist. Tough old bastard who could kill at the drop of a hat even in his old age...He was quite sold on that married Soldiers were less likely to return fire and engage as quickly as single Soldiers.

I find this an interesting and curious opinion and was wondering if anyone with experience would opine on the subject.

angus mac
08-31-2014, 23:13
I know people who have killed and I have met one murderer. The people who have killed do not talk about it,nor do I ask about it. The murderer told me in detail about what and how he did it. I know for a fact he was not lying. He had no conscience. He and I were alone in a dormitory,other people were away from us and he came to me and got to talking. He relished in what he was telling me. He wanted me to understand that it would not bother him to do it again. I listened to him without saying anything,even though he made me sick. I made sure from then on to have an awareness of where he was. I was glad when we were seperated. There is a lot of difference between a killer and a murderer. This p.o.s.was and is classified(in my book)as a coward with no qualities of having any emotions.