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Heretic
05-14-2008, 20:19
Trauma is cool as beans and when you have been sitting on a team going down range for a couple of years will or do you remember how to run a code? Did you forget about the medicine that you learned? I will try to help remedy that or at least pass on some knowledge to those that held on. I have had the great privilege of being able to work with some fine trauma Docs. Along with that I have worked with some outstanding family care Docs. We cannot forget about the tropical medicine that we learned in SFMS. So I will start this with passing on a link. I am not promoting this guy by any means! You can study his stuff for free by visiting his website! If this is inappropriate I will flog myself and buy someone a beer next time I am visiting the mother ship at Bragg.


http://www.multileadmedics.com/capnography.htm

Heretic

P.S. Next week: Non compressible bleeds.

Crap, Mods please move this to medical pearls of wisdom!

Heretic
05-21-2008, 08:32
I have been to one of his courses. He teaches a 15 lead EKG. His presentations are pretty impressive. The key note for me was the caponography. This is the keystone to determining tube placement. Caponography can provide some insight into breathing disorders helping the medic correct the O2 exchange problem. The caponography connects to the tube and you get a read out of exhaled CO2. You should see nice tombstone readouts with a reading of ETCO2 at normal limits. Here is a link that is unrelated to the post above.

http://www.capnography.com/outside/911.htm

adal
05-21-2008, 11:41
After getting out in 04 and starting work for a civilian EMS agency, I realized how much I had forgot about Code medicine. We just don't refresh enough on it. Any little bit helps. Between this and SS it's a good start to nudge you in a direction to remember how much you don't remember. thanks

Heretic
05-21-2008, 15:16
Hey I try. :D My focus for this thread will be medicine/tropical med type discussions with some dabbling in trauma. My current focus in life is transporting critically injured dudes.