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Penn
04-10-2008, 09:17
I have Verizon high speed internet. I keep getting a pop up asking to allow a connection to a DSN server. Is that normal? Thanks inadvance, Penn

Kyobanim
04-10-2008, 10:13
Do you mean DNS? DSN is a database connector.

Penn
04-10-2008, 13:05
Yes.

Kyobanim
04-10-2008, 14:21
DNS is Domain Name Server which is basically, a phone book for computers/websites. It shouldn't hurt to allow the connection but I can't see a reason for it to be doing so. If you can get on the internet without allowing the connection, then don't allow it. Better safe than sorry. I would call Verizon support and ask them what's going on with it.

Do you have a static IP for your connection?

Penn
04-10-2008, 15:09
Do you have a static IP for conection?[/QUOTE]

Well I am in the knuckledragger thread...your question would require me to ask what that is.....I'll call verizon. Thanks for the advice. Penn

SF_BHT
04-10-2008, 15:35
Do the following to see if you have a static IP:

Open Control Panel.
Open Network Connections
Right click your connection Icon that you are using (Normally Local Connection)
and click Properties.

Highlight TCP/IP (The bottom icon on the list) and click Properties.

If you have the (Obtain an IP address Automatically) clicked and (Use the following IP address) not clicked you have a dynamic IP Address.

If Use the following IP address is clicked you have a static IP address.

Hope that helps....

CRad
04-10-2008, 21:45
Do you have a static IP for conection?

Well I am in the knuckledragger thread...your question would require me to ask what that is.....I'll call verizon. Thanks for the advice. Penn[/QUOTE]

I am a little confused about that static IP as well. I run a basic windows program.

Isn't a static IP a bad thing where security is concerned? I could go wake Chuck up and ask but if you guys know the answer...Why bug him?

Penn
04-10-2008, 22:16
SF BHT, I did what you suggested, but made no changes. I wanted to know what is a dynamic IP Address is before I clicked anything. Tx again, p

CRad
04-10-2008, 22:49
SF BHT, I did what you suggested, but made no changes. I wanted to know what is a dynamic IP Address is before I clicked anything. Tx again, p


Me too and I wanted someone to do the work for me. However, that didn't happen. Google dynamic IP Address and see what you get. No, it's not easy and even looks like it makes life harder...a little bit.

I may be a total moron who is not getting the obvious but it looks to me like something that amounts to Chicken or Egg.

Here's one thing I can help you with - DSN is a military phone service or something close to that. It's what my husband uses to call home when he's deployed.

That pop-up thing - does it show up in a little yellow box that says something like "allow at this time" "Always allow" Etc? is it a box that has a pull down menu type deal?

Penn
04-10-2008, 23:36
YES

CRad
04-11-2008, 00:05
YES

I don't how computers work. I know that I have protective software installed and that I trust that software. Go with what is recommended.

Think about it - what is the absolute worst that happen?

Kyobanim
04-11-2008, 04:18
Go with what is recommended.

Think about it - what is the absolute worst that happen?

I don't think so. Worst that can happen is the system is comprimised without your knowledge, with your financial and personal data ending up being sold on the internet.

Call verison. That's my professional opinion.

Dan
04-11-2008, 07:27
Penn, The DNS server message is likely from your firewall. If not then let us know what program it is that is requesting it.

It's likely you don't have a static IP address (one that never changes) and instead have a dynamic IP address (one that changes when needed; usually when you reset your high speed "modem"). The DNS connection is likely because you recently moved to high speed Internet and your firewall is asking to connect on the new ISP's system, but it could be malicious.

I'm assuming you have a good anti-virus program and firewall installed on the system. If not then I'd recommend getting one immediately; then make sure you keep them both updated with the regular updates which can be done automatically if you set it up right. For ease of use I recommend Symantec's Internet Security that offers both in one; if you want a free version of both then there are threads in here discussing those already.

Next I'd recommend you get a router; even if you only have one computer connected. The router will act as a hardware firewall adding a layer of security. There are many types and brands of routers, but for ease of use I'll recommend one of these two depending on your needs.

- If you only need a wired setup then get this one: Linksys BEFSR41 (http://www.amazon.com/Linksys-EtherFast-Router-4-Port-BEFSR41/dp/B00004SB92/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1207916314&sr=8-1)

- If you want WiFi capability then get one that is compatible with your wireless requirements: i.e. this one (http://www.amazon.com/Linksys-WRT54G-Wireless-G-Router/dp/B00007KDVI/ref=pd_bbs_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1207916314&sr=8-2) has wireless (802.11g) and wired.

Place the router between your computer and your high speed Verizon. Use the router's manual to login to the router and make sure the firmware is up to date. Once your know the firmware is up to date; change your router password at a minimum to secure it.

This setup will provide you much more protection and at the same time fix your DNS problem as the router will handle your DNS issue with Verizon.

P.S. If you get a router with wireless be sure and secure it so others can't piggy back of you your ISP connection or login to your network.

SF_BHT
04-11-2008, 07:31
SF BHT, I did what you suggested, but made no changes. I wanted to know what is a dynamic IP Address is before I clicked anything. Tx again, p

What I posted was to find out if you have a ststic or Dynamic IP. My instructions do not change anything.

SF_BHT
04-11-2008, 07:39
Penn, The DNS server message is likely from your firewall. If not then let us know what program it is that is requesting it.

It's likely you don't have a static IP address (one that never changes) and instead have a dynamic IP address (one that changes when needed; usually when you reset your high speed "modem"). The DNS connection is likely because you recently moved to high speed Internet and your firewall is asking to connect on the new ISP's system, but it could be malicious.

I'm assuming you have a good anti-virus program and firewall installed on the system. If not then I'd recommend getting one immediately; then make sure you keep them both updated with the regular updates which can be done automatically if you set it up right. For ease of use I recommend Symantec's Internet Security that offers both in one; if you want a free version of both then there are threads in here discussing those already.

Next I'd recommend you get a router; even if you only have one computer connected. The router will act as a hardware firewall adding a layer of security. There are many types and brands of routers, but for ease of use I'll recommend one of these two depending on your needs.

- If you only need a wired setup then get this one: Linksys BEFSR41 (http://www.amazon.com/Linksys-EtherFast-Router-4-Port-BEFSR41/dp/B00004SB92/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1207916314&sr=8-1)

- If you want WiFi capability then get one that is compatible with your wireless requirements: i.e. this one (http://www.amazon.com/Linksys-WRT54G-Wireless-G-Router/dp/B00007KDVI/ref=pd_bbs_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1207916314&sr=8-2) has wireless (802.11g) and wired.

Place the router between your computer and your high speed Verizon. Use the router's manual to login to the router and make sure the firmware is up to date. Once your know the firmware is up to date; change your router password at a minimum to secure it.

This setup will provide you much more protection and at the same time fix your DNS problem as the router will handle your DNS issue with Verizon.

P.S. If you get a router with wireless be sure and secure it so others can't piggy back of you your ISP connection or login to your network.


Penn
Dan is right on the money. It may seam crazy putting another piece of hardware on but it has saved my but many times at work and at home when I am setting up opns. Where I am we get a lot of Chinese and North Korean hacking attempts for some reason. I guess South American IPs are more vulnerable....

Penn
04-11-2008, 08:02
Dan & Everybody, THANK YOU !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!