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View Full Version : A question of timing?


Ak68w
03-20-2008, 01:55
First off, I'd like to thank all the QPs for allowing little PFCs like me to interact with them and learn from their massive experience. I've only been in the Army 11 months or so. I am going to be a QP ultimately, but considering that I'm still pretty wet-behind-the-ears, I was considering going to the Regement as a Ranger Medic for a few years as a way to develop my soldier skills and maturity level as a soldier. I just don't want to be "that damn kid that the commander makes us babysit on missions." Any comments or advice?

(btw-I read a similar post, and The Reaper replied along the lines of "go SF or go Rangers, make your choice." I feel my question, while similar, is along a different path, though. I'm just wondering if my priorities are straight and what my 25-meter target should be at this point. If this has been asked before and I missed it or it's just a stupid question, feel free to delete this and correct me. Many thanks.)

Jack Moroney (RIP)
03-20-2008, 06:00
First off, I'd like to thank all the QPs for allowing little PFCs like me to interact with them )

I'm not sure if I know what a "little PFC" is, but I do know what a soldier is in the US Army and until you rearrange your mindset that you are a solider and not a "little PFC" or a "kid" then you are not ready for prime time in any unit. Being a Ranger does not make a you a good soldier, but it will make a good soldier better. Think about it.

Heretic
03-20-2008, 06:21
To echo Jack's words. Does not matter what you do in the Army. You are a soldier in the US Army. Let your balls drop and act like a man. Stop selling yourself short and let exude the confidence you have. Does not matter where you are a medic. Just be the best medic you can. Strive to keep learning your craft. Strive for the aura of confidence your soldiers have just because you are their medic. Stop with the "wet behind the ears" and "little PFC" comments truth be told everyone was/is wet behind the ears. You need to focus on being a soldier and learning what that means.

Ak68w
03-20-2008, 13:55
You know what, you're right! Thanks much sirs! I remember that we had an instructor in 68W school who said, "When you come upon a casulaty, assure him by saying that he's not gonna die because he has you, the best damn medic in the entire frickn Army, there to save him!" And I'm a pretty damn good soldier, too (not a QP, but good for conventional units). Thanks for the boost!

hotshot
04-05-2008, 17:49
You know what, you're right! Thanks much sirs! I remember that we had an instructor in 68W school who said, "When you come upon a casulaty, assure him by saying that he's not gonna die because he has you, the best damn medic in the entire frickn Army, there to save him!" And I'm a pretty damn good soldier, too (not a QP, but good for conventional units). Thanks for the boost!

AK,
FYI, when addressing more than one person, the proper term is "gentlemen". Good luck.

CH

Radar Rider
04-05-2008, 18:07
I do know what a soldier is in the US Army and until you rearrange your mindset that you are a solider and not a "little PFC" or a "kid" then you are not ready for prime time in any unit.

Dang. As a Platoon Sergeant, First Sergeant and Detachment Sergeant, I've always felt comfortable about referring to Soldiers as "my kids". I suppose that I shouldn't be so possessive.

Jack Moroney (RIP)
04-05-2008, 20:00
Dang. As a Platoon Sergeant, First Sergeant and Detachment Sergeant, I've always felt comfortable about referring to Soldiers as "my kids". I suppose that I shouldn't be so possessive.

Funny, I always worked with men. The only thing I possessed was the responsibility for ensuring that I did everything I could to enable them to succeed.

Radar Rider
04-05-2008, 21:59
Funny, I always worked with men. The only thing I possessed was the responsibility for ensuring that I did everything I could to enable them to succeed.

Noted, and understood Sir. Support elements (MI in my case) don't always have that luxury.