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SF18C
03-09-2008, 13:05
Female medic earns Silver Star in Afghan war (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23547346)

19-year-old only second woman to receive valor award since WWII

CAMP SALERNO, Afghanistan - A 19-year-old medic from Texas will become the first woman in Afghanistan and only the second woman since World War II to receive the Silver Star, the nation's third-highest medal for valor.

Army Spc. Monica Lin Brown saved the lives of fellow soldiers after a roadside bomb tore through a convoy of Humvees in the eastern Paktia province in April 2007, the military said.

After the explosion, which wounded five soldiers in her unit, Brown ran through insurgent gunfire and used her body to shield wounded comrades as mortars fell less than 100 yards away, the military said.

"I did not really think about anything except for getting the guys to a safer location and getting them taken care of and getting them out of there," Brown said Saturday at a U.S. base in the eastern province of Khost.

Brown, of Lake Jackson, Texas, is scheduled to receive the Silver Star later this month. She was part of a four-vehicle convoy patrolling near Jani Kheil in the eastern province of Paktia on April 25, 2007, when a bomb struck one of the Humvees.

Treating 'patients' under fire
"We stopped the convoy. I opened up my door and grabbed my aid bag," Brown said.

She started running toward the burning vehicle as insurgents opened fire. All five wounded soldiers had scrambled out.

"I assessed the patients to see how bad they were. We tried to move them to a safer location because we were still receiving incoming fire," Brown said.

Pentagon policy prohibits women from serving in frontline combat roles in the infantry, armor or artillery, for example. But the nature of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, with no real front lines, has seen women soldiers take part in close-quarters combat more than previous conflicts.

Four Army nurses in World War II were the first women to receive the Silver Star, though three nurses serving in World War I were awarded the medal posthumously last year, according to the Army's Web site.

Brown, of the 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, said ammunition going off inside the burning Humvee was sending shrapnel in all directions. She said they were sitting in a dangerous spot.

"So we dragged them for 100 or 200 meters, got them away from the Humvee a little bit," she said. "I was in a kind of a robot-mode, did not think about much but getting the guys taken care of."

No time to be scared
For Brown, who knew all five wounded soldiers, it became a race to get them all to a safer location. Eventually, they moved the wounded some 500 yards away, treated them on site before putting them on a helicopter for evacuation.

"I did not really have time to be scared," Brown said. "Running back to the vehicle, I was nervous (since) I did not know how badly the guys were injured. That was scary."

The military said Brown's "bravery, unselfish actions and medical aid rendered under fire saved the lives of her comrades and represents the finest traditions of heroism in combat."

Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester, of Nashville, Tenn., received the Silver Star in 2005 for gallantry during an insurgent ambush on a convoy in Iraq. Two men from her unit, the 617th Military Police Company of Richmond, Ky., also received the Silver Star for their roles in the same action.

Red Flag 1
03-09-2008, 14:56
Great story! Thanks.

RF 1

bandycpa
03-09-2008, 16:33
SF18C,

Thanks for posting this. Reading items like this helps me believe that there's hope for our younguns yet.

Kudos to SPC Brown. Great job, young soldier!


Bandy

sofmed
03-09-2008, 16:42
Outstanding!!

Great job, soldier!

Wishing you the best!

Mick

jbour13
03-09-2008, 19:04
Great job young lady.

That soldiers is in need of some SERGEANT stripes!;)

Team Sergeant

+1

Gypsy
03-09-2008, 19:14
Well done, Spc. Brown!

Team Sergeant
03-09-2008, 22:23
That soldiers is in need of some SERGEANT stripes!;)

Well done Spc. Monica Lin Brown.;)

Team Sergeant

The antihero
03-10-2008, 08:01
One brave girl. Well done Specialist!

Cold Steel
03-10-2008, 10:56
Outstanding!

FMF DOC
03-10-2008, 15:02
Female medic, 19, to receive Silver Star
By Fisnik Abrashi
Associated Press
Article Launched: 03/10/2008 12:01:00 AM CDT


CAMP SALERNO, Afghanistan A 19-year-old medic from Texas will become the second female soldier since World War II to receive the Silver Star, the nation's third-highest medal for valor.
Army Spc. Monica Lin Brown saved the lives of fellow soldiers after a roadside bomb tore through a convoy of Humvees in Afghanistan's eastern Paktia province in April 2007, the military said.
After the explosion, which wounded five soldiers in her unit, Brown ran through insurgent gunfire and used her body to shield wounded comrades as mortars fell less than 100 yards away, the military said.
"I did not really think about anything except for getting the guys to a safer location and getting them taken care of and getting them out of there," Brown said Saturday at a U.S. base in the eastern province of Khost.
Brown, of Lake Jackson, Texas, is scheduled to receive the Silver Star later this month. She was part of a four-vehicle convoy patrolling near Jani Kheil on April 25 when a bomb struck one of the Humvees.
"We stopped the convoy. I opened up my door and grabbed my aid bag," Brown said.
She started running toward the burning vehicle as insurgents opened fire. All five wounded soldiers had scrambled out.
For Brown, it became a race to get them all to a safer location. Eventually, she and others moved the wounded some 500 yards and treated them before putting them on a helicopter for evacuation.
"I did not really have time to be scared," Brown said. "Running back to the vehicle, I was nervous (since) I did not know how badly the guys were injured. That was scary."
The military said Brown's "bravery, unselfish actions and medical aid rendered under fire saved the lives of her comrades and represents the finest traditions of heroism in combat."
Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester, of Nashville, Tenn., along with two men in her unit, received the Silver Star in 2005 for gallantry during an insurgent ambush on a convoy in Iraq.

vsvo
03-10-2008, 15:10
Great job, SPC Brown!

SF_BHT
03-10-2008, 18:37
Great Job, Get the stripes out... You have earned them...

FMF DOC
03-11-2008, 08:00
Female medic earns Silver Star in Afghan war

19-year-old only second woman to receive valor award since WWII

CAMP SALERNO, Afghanistan - A 19-year-old medic from Texas will become the first woman in Afghanistan and only the second woman since World War II to receive the Silver Star, the nation's third-highest medal for valor.

Army Spc. Monica Lin Brown saved the lives of fellow soldiers after a roadside bomb tore through a convoy of Humvees in the eastern Paktia province in April 2007, the military said.

After the explosion, which wounded five soldiers in her unit, Brown ran through insurgent gunfire and used her body to shield wounded comrades as mortars fell less than 100 yards away, the military said.

"I did not really think about anything except for getting the guys to a safer location and getting them taken care of and getting them out of there," Brown said Saturday at a U.S. base in the eastern province of Khost.

Brown, of Lake Jackson, Texas, is scheduled to receive the Silver Star later this month. She was part of a four-vehicle convoy patrolling near Jani Kheil in the eastern province of Paktia on April 25, 2007, when a bomb struck one of the Humvees.

Treating 'patients' under fire
"We stopped the convoy. I opened up my door and grabbed my aid bag," Brown said.

She started running toward the burning vehicle as insurgents opened fire. All five wounded soldiers had scrambled out.

"I assessed the patients to see how bad they were. We tried to move them to a safer location because we were still receiving incoming fire," Brown said.

Pentagon policy prohibits women from serving in frontline combat roles — in the infantry, armor or artillery, for example. But the nature of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, with no real front lines, has seen women soldiers take part in close-quarters combat more than previous conflicts.

Four Army nurses in World War II were the first women to receive the Silver Star, though three nurses serving in World War I were awarded the medal posthumously last year, according to the Army's Web site.

Brown, of the 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, said ammunition going off inside the burning Humvee was sending shrapnel in all directions. She said they were sitting in a dangerous spot.

"So we dragged them for 100 or 200 meters, got them away from the Humvee a little bit," she said. "I was in a kind of a robot-mode, did not think about much but getting the guys taken care of."

No time to be scared
For Brown, who knew all five wounded soldiers, it became a race to get them all to a safer location. Eventually, they moved the wounded some 500 yards away, treated them on site before putting them on a helicopter for evacuation.

"I did not really have time to be scared," Brown said. "Running back to the vehicle, I was nervous (since) I did not know how badly the guys were injured. That was scary."

The military said Brown's "bravery, unselfish actions and medical aid rendered under fire saved the lives of her comrades and represents the finest traditions of heroism in combat."

Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester, of Nashville, Tenn., received the Silver Star in 2005 for gallantry during an insurgent ambush on a convoy in Iraq. Two men from her unit, the 617th Military Police Company of Richmond, Ky., also received the Silver Star for their roles in the same action.


FMF DOC , This was posted a few days before you posted it again, read and use the search button. Team Sergeant

mcarey
03-11-2008, 08:11
If what the story says is true, SPC Brown deserves it. I am glad to see a commander / chain of command took the time to recognize the valor of one of their soldiers. I wish every chain of command took the time to debrief and understand their soldiers actions. I think many more awards would be written. I and I am sure many on this forum know many men and women that deserve an award / recognition for going above and beyond as professional soldiers.

By always conducting debreifs of each patrol / action, the lessons learned prove invaluable. Awards are a great way to show your subordinatess you pay attention, care, and recognize their contributions.

echoes
03-11-2008, 13:14
Good for her, and a job well done!:)

Holly

dennisw
03-11-2008, 15:28
Well done Spc. Brown! Looks can be deceiving. She looks like the girl next door. Who would think she has that much grit.



9094

emoore
03-12-2008, 14:34
Being subjected to Hillary spouting off the last few weeks its refreshing to hear the words of a true American heroine.

dr. mabuse
03-12-2008, 21:20
Well done! After all, she's from the Republic of Texas...:cool:

Team Sergeant
03-12-2008, 21:46
Well done Spc. Brown! Looks can be deceiving. She looks like the girl next door. Who would think she has that much grit.



9094


Roger, looks can be deceiving, she might have the face of the girl next door but she's got the heart of a warrior.;)

Team Sergeant

Lothar
03-13-2008, 14:43
Outstanding Job, SPC Brown.

Warriors come in all sizes. In the end it is the individual's heart that was cultivated with good training and a mind to get the job done.

greenberetTFS
03-13-2008, 16:45
Definatly Sergeant Material.......

sofmed
03-17-2008, 17:27
SPC Brown made the 24 March edition of Army Times! (Page 4)

Again, I say, Outstanding!

Wishing you the best!

Mick

Blitzzz (RIP)
03-31-2008, 17:02
Good work SPC Brown. You displayed the stuff from which greatness is formed. Also I think there is another female soldier not mentioned. She was awarded the DFC she is a Black hawk pilot at Ft Campbell. Did some great work under fire while wounded. I helped with her rehab at Ft Campbell Army Hospital. Blitz

T-Whit
04-13-2008, 11:35
Outstanding job by an outstanding Soldier

afchic
11-30-2008, 22:05
Sorry to bring back an old thread, but Specialist Brown's story was on 60 minutes tonight. Interesting that quite a few individuals that were there that day, her SGM and her battalion commander all agreed to be interviewed, but the two men who's lives she saved declined to be interviewed. One of them told 60 minutes (according to 60 minutes) something along the jist of he didn't believe she deserved the award because women shouldn't be in combat.

The other individuals, besides her leadership, that did agree to interviews stated they think she was only doing her job, and the only reason she was awarded the silver star was because she was a woman.

Interested to hear if any of the rest of you saw the segment, and what your thoughts were.

From the background that was given, this girl had every opportunity to become the exact opposite of what she is. She didn't meet her father until she was 13 because he was in prison for drug possession/distribution. Her mom wasn't around a lot, therefore she was raised by her grandmother.

Kuddos to this warrior for showing other kids what they can aspire to if they only believe in themselves.

LongTabSigO
12-01-2008, 06:16
While the Army has been accused of giving out awards like they are samples, they generally get the high valor awards right. The award of Silver Star is not a venue the Army uses to push any EO agenda. Certainly not the 82d Airborne, a Brigade Combat Team of which SPC Brown's unit was part.

I can understand some Soldiers' sentiments about women in "combat" (that term now having a completely different meaning than in years past). That's a discussion worth having, but not here and not at the expense of de-emphasizing SPC Brown's achievements and valor.

According to posters above, there are only three females with high valor awards (2 x Silver Star, and 1 x DFC). I'd say the betting money is that she earned it for deeds, not gender.

Warrior-Mentor
12-01-2008, 07:50
Sorry to bring back an old thread, but Specialist Brown's story was on 60 minutes tonight.


Here's the link:
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4639029n

Jgood
12-01-2008, 11:45
Sorry to bring back an old thread, but Specialist Brown's story was on 60 minutes tonight. Interesting that quite a few individuals that were there that day, her SGM and her battalion commander all agreed to be interviewed, but the two men who's lives she saved declined to be interviewed. One of them told 60 minutes (according to 60 minutes) something along the jist of he didn't believe she deserved the award because women shouldn't be in combat.

The other individuals, besides her leadership, that did agree to interviews stated they think she was only doing her job, and the only reason she was awarded the silver star was because she was a woman.

Interested to hear if any of the rest of you saw the segment, and what your thoughts were.

From the background that was given, this girl had every opportunity to become the exact opposite of what she is. She didn't meet her father until she was 13 because he was in prison for drug possession/distribution. Her mom wasn't around a lot, therefore she was raised by her grandmother.

Kuddos to this warrior for showing other kids what they can aspire to if they only believe in themselves.


Wonder if they were worried about her being a women, as she saved their lives.

2018commo
12-01-2008, 15:29
Every time a member of this generation ticks me off, a SPC Brown comes along to straighten me out. This very well could be the next "greatest generation".
Good luck SPC Brown, I am sure you will soon become a member of a time honored corps, which is known as "The Backbone of the Army".

Team Sergeant
12-01-2008, 15:47
Sorry to bring back an old thread, but Specialist Brown's story was on 60 minutes tonight. Interesting that quite a few individuals that were there that day, her SGM and her battalion commander all agreed to be interviewed, but the two men who's lives she saved declined to be interviewed. One of them told 60 minutes (according to 60 minutes) something along the jist of he didn't believe she deserved the award because women shouldn't be in combat.

The other individuals, besides her leadership, that did agree to interviews stated they think she was only doing her job, and the only reason she was awarded the silver star was because she was a woman.

Interested to hear if any of the rest of you saw the segment, and what your thoughts were.
From the background that was given, this girl had every opportunity to become the exact opposite of what she is. She didn't meet her father until she was 13 because he was in prison for drug possession/distribution. Her mom wasn't around a lot, therefore she was raised by her grandmother.

Kuddos to this warrior for showing other kids what they can aspire to if they only believe in themselves.

I think most of us are on the same sheet of music and you have already seen our posts.

Male or female, you pull my ass out of a burning vehicle loaded with ammo, while under fire not only would I have shook your hand and said "Thank you" but I would have bought the beer. I would have also taken personal leave to ensure I was there to stand at attention while she received her Silver Star.

As a 19 y/o SPC with probably less than two years in the service, she did extremely well.

I can only surmise that the idiot that was disgruntled by her actions and award was probably a pvt and got "manhandled" by SPC Brown while "she" was rescuing him.....;)

Again, great job Spc. Brown, you deserve that award and more.

Team Sergeant

Blitzzz (RIP)
12-01-2008, 17:44
I believe most of us would certainly buy the beer. Some people are Naturals and she appears to be one. with total respect, Blitz

brianksain
05-07-2009, 14:01
Texas and Tennessee ...

SFWPNSSGT/SPC
05-29-2009, 07:03
I was pleasantly surprised in the quality of the female medics I met in Afghanistan. She is a shining example of such. Line medics there (in most areas) seem to better understand their importance, and she stepped up when called upon. I wanted to comment on the calls for promotion to sergeant. As a line medic, promotion is a bitter sweet thing. Being a medic NCO can significantly decrease your opportunities for "line" interaction. Award her the Silver Star, and re-institute a SPC-5 for her and others who show great proficiency (and cajones). It could help keep good medics on the line for a little bit longer.
Am I off target here?
-Mike

Cool Breeze
07-13-2010, 14:55
Whenever people used to ask me about women in combat, my standard reply was always,

"I am sure there are many women who can shoot better than me, hump a heavier ruck, run 2 miles faster, but that said, they should not serve in combat."

Time for me to be more open minded.

Sincerely. Thank God you were with your fellow soldiers, SPC Brown when the IED detonated. There are five soldiers who will get to go home to Mama because you were there and went above and beyond. I only hope that there are many more young troops that are just like you.

Primum non nocere

Cool Breeze
07-13-2010, 15:01
I was pleasantly surprised in the quality of the female medics I met in Afghanistan. She is a shining example of such. Line medics there (in most areas) seem to better understand their importance, and she stepped up when called upon. I wanted to comment on the calls for promotion to sergeant. As a line medic, promotion is a bitter sweet thing. Being a medic NCO can significantly decrease your opportunities for "line" interaction. Award her the Silver Star, and re-institute a SPC-5 for her and others who show great proficiency (and cajones). It could help keep good medics on the line for a little bit longer.
Am I off target here?
-Mike

Mike, As an 18D, I ran the TMC at SFQC Phase 1A in 03-04. Working for me was an outstanding 68W. I got him promoted to SPC in 04. Just spoke with him on Skype and with three Iraq tours, no negative spot reports, no article 15s, etc., he is now, still a SPC. He is another great medic who is getting out when he hits his ETS because he sees no future in the Army.

akv
07-13-2010, 15:04
A brave American soldier, great job! :lifter

Green Light
07-13-2010, 17:56
I'm glad someone bumped this thread - I hadn't seen it before. She's something else. I'm going to show this to my daughters. They're tough and they need to see that there's nothing they can't do if their heart is there.

I hope she's an NCO by now. She's a soldier who can stand as an example of what it is to be a warrior!

J8127
07-14-2010, 06:32
I can see the argument that her story was hyped up because she was an 18 year old girl. What did the soldier that helped her pull the bodies out or who drove the pickup truck to the evac site get? Awards are not always what they should be and it is very unfortunate. She acted with bravery and did her job very well, I don't want to sound like I am taking away from what she did, nor is it her fault. Sometimes people just get turned into something they never asked for.

A soldier I was with in that same province ran into a burning mrap and cut out the driver who was stuck in his seatbelt, he then dragged him out of the seat and carried him back down the ramp. By the time he got out of the truck they were both on fire and he put his driver out, then himself. This occurred while under SAF/IDF attack. He too was an 18 year old PFC, he got an ARCOM-V.

The one soldier who declined an interview because women have no place in combat should be reprimanded for his unprofessional behavior with the media.

I would think it isn't so much that this soldier does not deserve a silver star, as there are way to many other soldiers, marines, airmen, and sailors who never get the recognition they deserve for doing their job with honor against an enemy that has none.

MasterOfMyFate
07-15-2010, 23:13
I'm glad someone bumped this thread - I hadn't seen it before. She's something else. I'm going to show this to my daughters. They're tough and they need to see that there's nothing they can't do if their heart is there.

I hope she's an NCO by now. She's a soldier who can stand as an example of what it is to be a warrior!

^^According to the AFN commercials, she was promoted to SGT, but is no longer a Soldier.

Blender
07-16-2010, 11:10
I have to say, our awards system is pretty fucked up. Unfortunately that means that when someone does finally get recognized by their command for a job well done, it stirs up resentment among those who didn't.

I don't know how it used to be done, but today awards are pretty much rank and/or profession based. If you're x rank with x time in country you get x award. When I left my last deployment my partner in crime and I had done the exact same things and had the exact same award write up. We both got put in for BSM's. He got a BSM, I got a JSCOM. They flat out told me it was because I was an E-5 and that's the award E-5's get. Commies.

The idea that someone "is just doing their job" also comes into play. If an admin clerk happens to be in a convoy that's ambushed and he/she returns fire, they may get a Bronze Star with V. If a Ranger or 18 series shoots 50 muj in the face, caries his buddies to safety, and saves a puppy on the way out, he may get ARCOM with V, because "he was just doing his job".

Then you add the perception that women may get recognized as an EO ploy of some sort, and it ramps up the bitterness. Unfortunately that bitterness sends the wrong message to our commanders. When they finally pay enough attention to recognize a young soldier and it stirs up resentment among their troops, they will remember that reaction when the next award request is sitting on their desk.

Irish_Army01
07-17-2010, 08:02
That soldiers is in need of some SERGEANT stripes!;)

Well done Spc. Monica Lin Brown.;)

Team Sergeant

lol, I was just thinking that. Will this up her in the list for promotion?

MasterOfMyFate
07-17-2010, 09:11
lol, I was just thinking that. Will this up her in the list for promotion?

She was ALREADY promoted a few years ago, but she is not in the Service anymore, according to the AFN commercial with her in it. "Former Army SGT......"

Team Sergeant
07-17-2010, 10:00
I can see the argument that her story was hyped up because she was an 18 year old girl. What did the soldier that helped her pull the bodies out or who drove the pickup truck to the evac site get? Awards are not always what they should be and it is very unfortunate. She acted with bravery and did her job very well, I don't want to sound like I am taking away from what she did, nor is it her fault. Sometimes people just get turned into something they never asked for.

A soldier I was with in that same province ran into a burning mrap and cut out the driver who was stuck in his seatbelt, he then dragged him out of the seat and carried him back down the ramp. By the time he got out of the truck they were both on fire and he put his driver out, then himself. This occurred while under SAF/IDF attack. He too was an 18 year old PFC, he got an ARCOM-V.

The one soldier who declined an interview because women have no place in combat should be reprimanded for his unprofessional behavior with the media.

I would think it isn't so much that this soldier does not deserve a silver star, as there are way to many other soldiers, marines, airmen, and sailors who never get the recognition they deserve for doing their job with honor against an enemy that has none.

You don't get it, read the post below, Blender get's it.

Had an 11B or any "Combat Arms" soldier done what she had done they might not have received anything but a pat of the back. It's what we do. But you're right when an Air Force type or female does the same thing it would be considered a courageous act well outside their military training and then they should receive an award.
If you wish to bitch about awards go somewhere else and do so your complaints are falling on deaf ears here.

Team Sergeant


I have to say, our awards system is pretty fucked up. Unfortunately that means that when someone does finally get recognized by their command for a job well done, it stirs up resentment among those who didn't.

I don't know how it used to be done, but today awards are pretty much rank and/or profession based. If you're x rank with x time in country you get x award. When I left my last deployment my partner in crime and I had done the exact same things and had the exact same award write up. We both got put in for BSM's. He got a BSM, I got a JSCOM. They flat out told me it was because I was an E-5 and that's the award E-5's get. Commies.

The idea that someone "is just doing their job" also comes into play. If an admin clerk happens to be in a convoy that's ambushed and he/she returns fire, they may get a Bronze Star with V. If a Ranger or 18 series shoots 50 muj in the face, caries his buddies to safety, and saves a puppy on the way out, he may get ARCOM with V, because "he was just doing his job".
Then you add the perception that women may get recognized as an EO ploy of some sort, and it ramps up the bitterness. Unfortunately that bitterness sends the wrong message to our commanders. When they finally pay enough attention to recognize a young soldier and it stirs up resentment among their troops, they will remember that reaction when the next award request is sitting on their desk.

J8127
07-17-2010, 10:32
You don't get it, read the post below, Blender get's it.

Had an 11B or any "Combat Arms" soldier done what she had done they might not have received anything but a pat of the back. It's what we do. But you're right when an Air Force type or female does the same thing it would be considered a courageous act well outside their military training and then they should receive an award.
If you wish to bitch about awards go somewhere else and do so your complaints are falling on deaf ears here.

Team Sergeant

I do get it, and I don't agree with it. Are you saying that you think ones job should come into play? I don't think it should, I think awards for valor are aligned with a certain amount of bravery, and what job you are, what is between your legs, or what service you are in should not matter. Of course this is going to lead to an imbalance where Combat Arms personnel are receiving awards that the support types will probably never see, but that's how it should be.

Big Boss
07-18-2010, 05:19
Rejoice ye in that day, and leap for joy: for, behold, your reward is great in heaven: for in the like manner did their fathers unto the prophets. (Luke 6:23)

Great story, thank you for sharing.

Team Sergeant
07-18-2010, 13:29
I do get it, and I don't agree with it. Are you saying that you think ones job should come into play? I don't think it should, I think awards for valor are aligned with a certain amount of bravery, and what job you are, what is between your legs, or what service you are in should not matter. Of course this is going to lead to an imbalance where Combat Arms personnel are receiving awards that the support types will probably never see, but that's how it should be.

No you still don't get it. Then again you're in the AF where one can never get enough ribbons' and patches.....:rolleyes:

Take your awards complaints elsewhere.

This thread is now closed.

Team Sergeant