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echoes
06-13-2007, 15:16
Greetings.

I hope it is okay to ask this here. (I did use the search function first.)
I was curious if anyone has ever used/had one of these? After a few days of trying an IV on tiny veins, this has been proposed as the last result.

Thank You for any replies.

Holly

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PICC_line
Peripherally inserted central catheter
(Redirected from PICC line)

"Correct position of PICC line on chest x-rayA peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC or PIC line) is a form of intravenous access that can be used for a prolonged period of time, e.g. for long chemotherapy regimens, extended antibiotic therapy or total parenteral nutrition."

Sdiver
06-13-2007, 15:30
I see them quit often. Almost everyday in fact. Transporting Pts. to dialysis, and also quit a few of the elderly in Nursing homes have PIC lines, mostly due to the fact, as you stated having smaller veins, in which to start an IV.

The procedure is usually an outpatient procedure, sometimes done in the ED/ER. They're usually found in the upper arm area or just below the clavicles, in the upper chest area.

It's usually a swift procedure and once you have a patent site on a Pt., you're GTG, for quit awhile.

Hope this helps.

echoes
06-13-2007, 15:49
Thanks Sdiver.

Sis is in for surgery, and we are down to the last hours, and no IV person has been able to make the IV stick.

We're just anxious about it, it sounds invasive.

Holly

Sdiver
06-13-2007, 16:23
Holly,

I had a feeling that's what/who it was for. Not to worry though, she'll make it alright.

Let her know we're all pulling for her......



.....and she still owes me a dance......when she's ready. ;) :D

echoes
06-13-2007, 16:37
Sdiver,

Thank You.:)

Holly

Roguish Lawyer
06-13-2007, 20:45
My son has one. They are great. Nothing to worry about.

18C/GS 0602
06-14-2007, 07:50
echoes-

PICC lines are very safe. A lot of the time they are placed under ultrasound guidance and are typically not more painful than putting in a regular IV. Like others have mentioned we use them when a person is going to need prolonged IV access. They have a lower complication rate, and are less invasive than central access, which is the last step if all else fails. Let us know if you have any other questions. Good luck.

echoes
06-14-2007, 09:05
RL--I hope your son is doing well. Sis went in last night and they put her to sleep with gas, and the surgery folks put an IV in her foot instead of a PIC. Never seen that before. Recovering now, gtg so far.

bdonham--Thank You for the information. The unknown can be scary sometimes.

Holly

Razor
06-14-2007, 22:48
If its for long-term use, be sure to flush it regularly with saline, and finishing each infusion with a heparin 'lock' is a good way to play it safe and keep the line clear. Having a one-way valve on the distal end makes life a bit easier and more comfortable, as you don't have to deal with the external plastic clamps. Wrapping your arm in plastic wrap before every shower in order to keep the dressing dry is a real PITA, though.

Wish your sister well for me, Holly.

echoes
06-15-2007, 07:22
Razor, will do. Thanks for that information. :)

Holly

The Reaper
06-15-2007, 08:34
Can't add anything medically, but best wishes and prayers out for Kristy, and for you.

TR

Roguish Lawyer
06-15-2007, 08:40
If its for long-term use, be sure to flush it regularly with saline, and finishing each infusion with a heparin 'lock' is a good way to play it safe and keep the line clear. Having a one-way valve on the distal end makes life a bit easier and more comfortable, as you don't have to deal with the external plastic clamps. Wrapping your arm in plastic wrap before every shower in order to keep the dressing dry is a real PITA, though.

Wish your sister well for me, Holly.

All true. We use 3cc saline followed by 2cc heparin. The one way valves are key -- they make it really easy.

CoLawman
06-15-2007, 09:46
prayers out to your sister Holly. RL your son is still in my prayers as well.

echoes
06-15-2007, 09:49
TR--Thank You. :)

RL-Thank You for that information. Overnight her IV failed, again. (Her foot looks like a football.)

Found a vein in her arm, so no PIC yet. Good to know for the future, though.

Slow-going, but fingers crossed.

Holly

swatsurgeon
06-18-2007, 08:41
only thing to add is hand exercises....racketball or tennis ball...promotes venous return and decreases chances for blood clots in arm. Small risk overall unless patient is not moving at all, but may as well make the risk even less.
ss

echoes
06-19-2007, 12:20
Swatsurgeon--great information Sir.

Round one is over for now, but if things do not improve, back we go.;)

Holly

echoes
07-14-2007, 19:59
Update:
This time when I had to confer about a PIC line, I used the knowledge from this thread, and all fears were eased. It was smooth sailing, and guess what? Blood can be drawn w/o any pain...even while the person is sleeping. Very cool.;)

Thank you guys for the info. It is trusted.

Holly

p.s. There's a really great Ranger Handbook... thread under this update...great info!

echoes
07-18-2007, 17:38
I was curious if anyone here had any experience with "Prednisone?", given for pain? Know it is a steroid, and am hoping for good results? Curious, and thank you.

Holly

adal
07-18-2007, 18:55
Prednisone is a corticosteroid. Normally used to reduce inflammation. Can be use in conjunction with other meds for slightly different results. Fairly safe and wide spread use. Just be sure to follow directions for tapering off the meds. Hope this helps. Google had some good hits for prednisone too.
adal

Razor
07-18-2007, 23:41
...and guess what? Blood can be drawn w/o any pain...even while the person is sleeping. Very cool.;)

Yes, its nice not to get stuck twice a day. However, you may find that many lab folks won't draw from a PICC; you'll need to have the draw done by a nurse. Something about injecting the saline before the draw, or the hep lock following.

Roguish Lawyer
07-19-2007, 10:51
I was curious if anyone here had any experience with "Prednisone?", given for pain? Know it is a steroid, and am hoping for good results? Curious, and thank you.

Holly

I started a Medrol dose pack this morning for a pinched nerve which is causing severe pain in my left shoulder and arm. It treats inflammation, but also is used for other stuff. One of our cats also is taking it for something else, and my son is taking something similar as part of chemotherapy for leukemia.

echoes
07-19-2007, 16:23
adal, thank You Sir for that information.:)

Razor, the PICC really helped...and learned quickly about the fact only nurses need to be using it.

RL, I hope You and Your son get better soon. Sis actually broke out in hives as of this morning, so off we went. Benedryl helps, and we are going for an extended stay at a great hospital next month.

Take care all,

Holly