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Evangelist
04-27-2007, 14:17
Greetings Gentlemen,
I have used the search function, but have not found the information that I am looking for. Can any of you guys tell me about your contact with the Chaplains? Especially those Chaplains attached to SF Groups.

I am aware of the Chaplain Officer Basic and Advance training, but what additional training do those attached to SF Groups go through? I have seen some pictures of Vietnam era Chaplains wearing their jumpwings, so this tells me that they have completed Airborne School. But I have also seen a few with berets and tabs. Given the status of a non-combatant how is this possible?

Thank you for your time and service!

The Reaper
04-27-2007, 14:25
Evangelist:

Please read the stickies and introduce yourself in the proper place.

Chaplains sent to Airborne units will normally go to Airborne school. This allows them to jump in with the troops.

All of the chaplains I have known who were SF, Ranger, etc. were previously members of those units and became qualified before they became chaplains. There is no real reason for them to have the specialty school to minister to the members.

Good luck.

TR

Jack Moroney (RIP)
04-27-2007, 16:22
But I have also seen a few with berets and tabs.

During my career, these have been the folks that have been most effective with the troops as they share a common bond and level of credibility when it comes to listening to those who from time to time like to avail themselves of the services a chaplain can provide. Chaplains with whom I have worked have performed many roles, one such is doing some background research on religions in target areas and providing as valuable sources of analytical information when it comes to working with various populations in the world. My favorite Chaplain of all time was Grady Spry (RIP) who showed up one day in my A-Camp sporting a sawed off M-79 grenade launcher strapped to his leg. He played a mean game of cards, carried a portfolio of his "girls" in his wallet (all of which were his daughters which he would admit only when folks got a little concerned about his collection), and could bring the heat of a lightning bolt to help you focus on what was really important when necessary. I have also known pompous assess who thought that it was their job to save the sinners in uniform, non of whom lasted long-at least with me. Chaplains can be very effective and important members of a commander's team, however they have to understand that the military is not the civilain community, the needs are different, the target audience is different and while the message you bring might be the same it has to make room for all and be tuned to the needs of the troop and not the needs of the particular faith from which you hail. Perhaps the biggest trait you are going to need to be effective is a good sense of humor.:D

Evangelist
04-27-2007, 22:11
Col. Moroney,
Thank you for sharing your experiences.

magician
04-28-2007, 01:39
A chaplain named Paul Barkey helped me out when I really needed some help, back in 1987.

Chaplain Barkey was a Major, and assigned as the command chaplain at the Special Warfare Center on Ft. Bragg.

I was getting married and getting out of the Army on a ROTC scholarship at the time. I was confronting a number of personal dilemmas that Chaplain Barkey helped me navigate.

He was a good man. I have never forgotten him, or his reply when I asked him how I could ever repay his kindness to me. He told me, "just pay it forward. When someone else needs help, help them. That is the best way that you can repay me."

I have tried to follow this advice, and still do. When others ask me, today, how they can repay any favor that I do for them, I tell them what Chaplain Barkey told me: "pay it forward."

I also remember Chaplain Larry Mack very fondly. Chaplain Mack was the Battalion Chaplain at 2d Ranger Battalion in the early 1980's. When we deployed for war, he jumped in with the boys under fire, and he and his assistant, a guy named Flores, augmented the HHC medics in the Battalion Aid Station.

Another good man.

The Reaper
04-28-2007, 11:15
Chaplain (COL) Neil Dennington.

Chaplain Dennington was a former SOG NCO with a Silver Star.

He was the 7th Group Chaplain when I met him and married my wife and I.

Heckuva guy.

TR

Ambush Master
04-28-2007, 11:47
Greetings I am aware of the Chaplain Officer Basic and Advance training, but what additional training do those attached to SF Groups go through? I have seen some pictures of Vietnam era Chaplains wearing their jumpwings, so this tells me that they have completed Airborne School. But I have also seen a few with berets and tabs. Given the status of a non-combatant how is this possible?

Thank you for your time and service!

Martha Raye (a nurse and I believe a LTC in the Guard or Reserve), numerous reporters and I am sure some "Men of the Cloth" have taken up arms to defend themselves when in a Combat Zone!!

If you think for a nanosecond that the Islamic or other enemies of this country are not going to kill you because you are a "Non-Combatant", then you will be both, sadly and fatally mistaken!!!

Later
Martin

Jack Moroney (RIP)
04-28-2007, 12:02
We had a Catholic chaplin in the 10th SFG in the early 70s that had a bulldog that he would bring to mass. The dog would sit quietly, I guess you might call him an alter dog for lack of a better term, at the foot of the alter during Mass after following his master in and then at the end of mass he would follow him out. Now back in those days we were all in the temporary WWII buildings and the chapel , being of the same construction, was nestled in the woods. It was one of the early Spring Sunday mornings when the buds were popping, the birds were in fine voice, and the chapel was bathed in a warmer than normal sun. In order to capture the local ambience of such a fine day the doors were left wide open and the aroma of early blossoms wafted into the building. Now, while I think the door was left open to draw in those few non-church folks that needed to make good on that silent prayer thanking the Big Guy for the successful opening of that old T-10 without twists, it was the arrival of two very amourous chipmunks that came sliding and skidding down those old over polished red linomleum floors. The alter dog, breaking his training regimen as alter dog, took off down the aisle after those two stripped rodents and disappeared outside. Mass ended shortly after-that.:D

Now I am not a church goer and the Battalion Chaplain had been trying to gather up his flock ever since he arrived at his new duty station in Korea. He was a great guy, good sense of humor, but could be just a little bit of a pain in the 4th POC about the need for folks to attend his service. For the first 6 months I just did not have time to go as I was the Battalion "3" and spent most of my time either out checking training, running operations, or preparing training and Sunday was a good day to make sure things were straight for the upcoming week. A good friend of mine, Bill Olds, whom some of you might know and many of you have seen as the NVA General being skyhooked during "The Green Berets", talked me into accompanying him to Christmas mid-night Mass . He was convinced I needed some devine "guidance" and because I would normally be sleeping at this time he reasoned that I had no other diversions to keep me from having my soul saved. For some reason, that was soon to become apparent after I walked into the chapel at Camp Hovey, Bill was late and we hustled to get to the service. As we walked into the building the place was packed and the Chaplain had started his service. He looked up, saw me coming in the door, quietly stopped his deliberations, smiled one of those all knowing and triumphant grins as if to say "finally" and with great sense of purpose walked over to the wall of the church throwing himself against the pillar as if to keep the place from collapsing. Must have worked, the building did not fall:D

hetzer
04-29-2007, 12:22
PM sent in reference to a (our) chaplain at 3/20th.

Chappy
07-02-2007, 18:53
you have pm

Monsoon65
07-04-2007, 18:43
The Chaplain that gave the opening prayer when my German class graduated from DLI in 1986 had an SF combat patch, CIB, and Silver Star. Can't remember the gent's name at this time, tho.

The Reaper
07-04-2007, 18:53
The Chaplain that gave the opening prayer when my German class graduated from DLI in 1986 had an SF combat patch, CIB, and Silver Star. Can't remember the gent's name at this time, tho.


I believe that would be Chaplain Dennington.

TR

Monsoon65
07-04-2007, 19:46
I believe that would be Chaplain Dennington.

TR

TR:

Thanks! I was thinking he was the same Chaplain that you had mentioned. I know we all took notice of this individual when he was there.

JMI
07-04-2007, 20:08
We had a Catholic chaplin in the 10th SFG in the early 70s that had a bulldog that he would bring to mass. The dog would sit quietly, I guess you might call him an alter dog for lack of a better term, at the foot of the alter during Mass after following his master in and then at the end of mass he would follow him out. Now back in those days we were all in the temporary WWII buildings and the chapel , being of the same construction, was nestled in the woods. It was one of the early Spring Sunday mornings when the buds were popping, the birds were in fine voice, and the chapel was bathed in a warmer than normal sun. In order to capture the local ambience of such a fine day the doors were left wide open and the aroma of early blossoms wafted into the building. Now, while I think the door was left open to draw in those few non-church folks that needed to make good on that silent prayer thanking the Big Guy for the successful opening of that old T-10 without twists, it was the arrival of two very amourous chipmunks that came sliding and skidding down those old over polished red linomleum floors. The alter dog, breaking his training regimen as alter dog, took off down the aisle after those two stripped rodents and disappeared outside. Mass ended shortly after-that.:D

Now I am not a church goer and the Battalion Chaplain had been trying to gather up his flock ever since he arrived at his new duty station in Korea. He was a great guy, good sense of humor, but could be just a little bit of a pain in the 4th POC about the need for folks to attend his service. For the first 6 months I just did not have time to go as I was the Battalion "3" and spent most of my time either out checking training, running operations, or preparing training and Sunday was a good day to make sure things were straight for the upcoming week. A good friend of mine, Bill Olds, whom some of you might know and many of you have seen as the NVA General being skyhooked during "The Green Berets", talked me into accompanying him to Christmas mid-night Mass . He was convinced I needed some devine "guidance" and because I would normally be sleeping at this time he reasoned that I had no other diversions to keep me from having my soul saved. For some reason, that was soon to become apparent after I walked into the chapel at Camp Hovey, Bill was late and we hustled to get to the service. As we walked into the building the place was packed and the Chaplain had started his service. He looked up, saw me coming in the door, quietly stopped his deliberations, smiled one of those all knowing and triumphant grins as if to say "finally" and with great sense of purpose walked over to the wall of the church throwing himself against the pillar as if to keep the place from collapsing. Must have worked, the building did not fall:D
Another great story. Somebody has to prod you into writing a book. People rarely have such mental capacity to remember the details, and even fewer can put it into words. Damn shame you're not typing away now, sir.