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NousDefionsDoc
04-11-2004, 13:29
We did this once before, but let's do it again. Medics, your recommendations for a First Aid Kit for non-medical personnel for the home. Include recommendations for the carrier please.

Surgicalcric
04-11-2004, 20:35
TT-FRB

Miscellaneous
(2) Trauma Shears
(1) Mini-Mag Light or other light of choosing
(1) LED Head-lamp
(1) 4x8 notepad
(10) Pair Gloves
(1) Pair AIDS Shades

Trauma/Bandaging
(10) 5x9's
(20) 4x4's
(2) 12x30 Trauma Dressing
(4) Vasoline Gauze
(2) Rolls 3" Tape
(2) Rolls 1" Tape
(10) Rolls 3" Kerlix
(5) Rolls Coban
(2) Ice Packs
(2) Hot Packs
(5) Cravats
(2) SAM Splints
(2) 4" Elastic Bandages
(2) 3" Elastic Bandages
(2) 5x9 H2O Gel Burn Pads
(2) Tubes Antibiotic Ointment
(20) Betadine Swabs
(1) Bottle Sterile Water
(1) Sawyer Snake Bite Extractor Kit.

Medications
(2) Tubes Insta-Glucose (if diabetic in residence)
(1) Tube Activated Charcoal
(1) Bottle ASA
(1) Bottle Motrin
(1) Bottle Benadryl
(1) Tube Topical Benadryl
(1) Bottle Anti-emetic
(1) Bottle Anti-diarrheal
(2) Epi Pens-Adult (if applicable)

Airway
(1) CPR Mask

myclearcreek
04-11-2004, 21:07
1) I found this, TT-FRB....
http://www.pssstequipment.com/product_1992_detailed.htm,
which looks to be a very efficient carrier, but not available to the general public. Is there a public source or a similar product any of you could recommend? I am particularly interested in something to carry in my vehicle.

2) With high temperatures, say low hundreds, should items with an expiration date be exchanged or would they survive a Summer without a problem? In addition to things listed above, we usually carry an extra inhaler of albuterol.

Rhonda

Surgicalcric
04-11-2004, 21:18
http://www.lightfighter.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=383

The supplies should be good thru a summer there.

The inhaler is a good idea for your son. I missed that one.

myclearcreek
04-11-2004, 21:23
Originally posted by Surgicalcric
http://www.lightfighter.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=383

The supplies should be good thru a summer there.

Thanks.

The inhaler is a good idea for your son. I missed that one.

Not everyone has asthma or respiratory problems, but he suffers more during the Summer. We also carry a benadryl-type ointment and tablet, but I am considering asking for an epi-pen for him, since he is more active.

lrd
04-12-2004, 08:32
If you have family members who take prescription meds, do you recommend keeping emergency supplies in the FAK?

Edit: I posted this before I saw the FAK (vehicle) thread. I was thinking in terms of a portable FAK.

Surgicalcric
04-12-2004, 08:52
I would keep all prescription medications somewhere else. Place them in a cupboard, medicine cabinet, refrigerator (if meds require refrigeration ie: abx, insulin), etc.

It would also do you guys well to have a list of medications taken by any family member in your household who has a chronic illness (diabetes, end-stage renal disease, asthma, angina, hypertension, etc) available for EMS incase of emergency along with the MD's name(s) and any known allergies to medications (penecillin, 'Caine drugs, sulfa, etc).

HTH

Sacamuelas
04-12-2004, 08:52
LRD-

To answer your question for the vehicle, I think that takes you having specific knowledge of what meds you are taking as well as what type of trip you are embarking on.

A lot of medications are not stabile long term in the Heat that will be incurred in an automobile with the windows up/in the sun.

Always keeping everyday routine Rx meds in a car is not very prudent unless you are traveling through a remote location where stranding for long periods of time is likely. In that specific case, you could stock your emergency kit for the specific purpose trip to include a few days worth of your critical meds (Hrt, BP, Psych, Blood thinners, etc)

Just my .02

lrd
04-12-2004, 09:23
Surgicalcric and Sacamuelas,

You told me what I figured to be the case. I don't keep emergency supplies of meds in the vehicle, but I've wondered if I should. When we were in Japan, a 4 hr road trip could turn into a 2 day road trip if there was a wreck. I always carried meds just in case, but stopped when we returned CONUS.

We have a family member who has seizures due to a head injury. A while back, a member of this board suggested I carry the following items and gave me the appropriate instructions for use:

Seizure Kit

- Bite stick (tongue depressor with tape or a commercial model) to prevent breaking teeth or biting tongue
- Instaglucose or other sweet shelf stable source of dissolved sugar (siezures use an incredible amount of energy and sugar stores...violent siezure activity can often result in low blood sugar)
- Bulb syringe for suction of secretions
- Rag for GP
- Change of clothes

I will add them to your list, Surgicalcric.

NousDefionsDoc
04-12-2004, 09:34
No HCA Crip?

Sacamuelas
04-12-2004, 10:12
Originally posted by lrd
Surgicalcric and Sacamuelas,

- Bite stick (tongue depressor with tape or a commercial model) to prevent breaking teeth or biting tongue

That is a great list... However, there is one thing in there that is wrong, IMO.

You are MUCH more likely to break teeth with a tongue depressor or ANYTHING in your mouth during a seizure than with an empty mouth. This is due to the physics of the bite mechanism. With an empty mouth, all 32 (28 for most of us) teeth take some of the force with the 12 anterior teeth (front six upper/lower teeth)getting less force than the back molars due to the further distance away from the fulcrum(jaw joint(TMJ)). This is natural and protects the teeth from damaging forces. The forces are distributed vertically which is how mother nature designed our choppers to take forces.

However, when you place an item into the mouth, ALL the force of the bite will be placed only on the teeth that are contacted by the object. This does two things, it usually places a very unhealthy amount of force on the ANTERIOR teeth ( likely where the stick is going to be placed in a seizing patient) by causing 12 teeth to take the force normally applied to 32 and also causes lateral and awkward angular forces onto the teeth instead of the easier to withstand vertical force.

The tongue depressor wrapped in tape MAY help a tongue from being chewed IF you can get it into the patients mouth during a seizure, but I personally don't recomment putting an object into a patients mouth. The patients I have had that seized required protection from injuring themselves (body motion), support, and every once in a while a injection of meds to stop the activity. I have never placed intraoral bite appliances.

This is not to say Crip is wrong, (well, okay it is but I am being nice after my butt kicking on here lately! haha) just a differing professional opinion.:cool:

Maple Flag
04-12-2004, 10:53
I was surprised to see the reference to a bite stick. They are a big no-no for us.

Primary reason is the risk of foreign object(s) (bite stick, or parts thereof, broken teeth, bitten off finger tips, etc) going into the airway during the seizure. I'll be the first to admit though that a bitten off tongue can just as easily obstruct an airway, so it's a question of trading one risk for another.

Other reasons include difficulty in placing the bite stick without restraining the head of the patient, and risk of injury to all parties during seizure.

Generally speaking, we (BLS provider) are taught to provide padding under the head, move furniture and other dangerous obstacles out of the way, and wait it out for a maximum of 5 minutes from the start of the seizure. A history taken after the patient recovers will indicate if this is a regular occurrence for them or if the cause of the seizure needs further investigation.

If the seizure lasts more than 5 minutes, or a second seizure occurs, your patient becomes a critical transport/ALS call.

Surgicalcric
04-12-2004, 12:18
I am not the one who suggested a bite stick for seizures.

Nothing goes into the mouth while the patient is actively seizing, especially fingers or even afterwards while he/she is postictal. Supportive care only means moving everything from around the pateint that they may come in contact with. It is best just to let them shake and shimmy until it ends as long as there is nothing impeding there movement ie: furniture.

Surgicalcric
04-12-2004, 12:26
Originally posted by NousDefionsDoc
No HCA Crip? I was not aware they were available to the lay person.

I might, might be okay with TraumaDEX but under no circumstance would I endorse them to carry Quickclot.

I would be okay with a CLS or an ODA team member who has received medic cross-training and specific training on the uses of HCA's using either, but I think the lay person would be too quick to use it. We have enough trouble in EMS with medics skipping the BLS skills and going straight for the perceived cooler ALS skills.

Just my.02...

What about you, additions/deletions?

Sacamuelas
04-12-2004, 12:45
My bad Crip.. my apology .

Lrd- be clearer so that I can direct my fire to the appropriate provider/medic. ;) LOL just kidding, I don't care who it was.

lrd
04-12-2004, 12:47
Originally posted by Sacamuelas
This is not to say Crip is wrong, (well, okay it is but I am being nice after my butt kicking on here lately! haha) just a differing professional opinion. I don't think I ever said it was Surgicalcric. :)

The advice was given to me in answer to a question re:seizure care for me by my family when out hiking in the wild woods. I'm the one who has seizures, and have -- in the past -- bitten a hunk out of my tongue. I believe the tongue depressor was suggested because I didn't want to eat the rest of my tongue. The main focus of the advice I was given is as follows:

"Protection of your melon is foremost, body parts second. Make sure everyone is educated on your condition and even run a scenario or two with EVERYONE who you are going out with so they ALL know what to do in case you have a siezure. Otherwise it will be your luck to be with the ONE person who is clueless...and it could cost you your life.

You should not be restrained during your activity, and should be placed in the recovery position for your post-ictal period. You of course know this part...once you regain consciousness...simple fluid rehydration and if necessary, the sugar compound IN PARTS...NOT ALL AT ONCE can be tolerated until you are able to stand again."

Good advice, I think.

Thanks for the explanation re:bite force, etc. It is my experience, however, that I put more pressure on the right back teeth than anyplace else. Maybe I have a weird mouth. I have had my wisdom teeth removed and seemed to change my bite.

I don't think anyone has tried to place anything in my mouth during a seizure for years -- but I really don't remember. lol

Sacamuelas
04-12-2004, 13:06
Originally posted by lrd

"Protection of your melon is foremost, body parts second.


AAAHHHHHH CRAP !!!! That sure does sound like the linguistic signature of EAGLE. If it is.. it looks I am going to be 2 for 2 on getting hammered the last two days on AProf. LOL

Tell me I am wrong LRD... Please! HAHAHA

Going to load my pimp gun, stock up on Ray-O-vac gucci weapon lights, fuel clamps and take off my bullet magnet in preparation for the remarks, "The Eagle has landed". :p

end of hijack...

lrd
04-12-2004, 13:11
Originally posted by Sacamuelas
Tell me I am wrong LRD... Please! HAHAHA
Like I said: good advice. ;)

Hijack over.

Sacamuelas
04-12-2004, 15:17
LRD-
Pm back at ya. BTW- why not post a new thread about Seizures in this forum... everyone needs to review basic TX , Do's and Don'ts and helpful tips for epilepsy.

Just a suggestion...NDD might tell you a love poem or something if you did, he likes med threads. Although after reading all the threads I missed this weekend, he seems to be "wooing" Solid right now with compliments so you may have to wait your turn behind the 18yr boy with a British accent and self proclaimed "pretty mouth"!!! LOL HAHAHA

hijack over-
Back to first aid kit for home, any more suggestions or things everyone feels are not needed for the average person?

lrd
04-12-2004, 15:46
Originally posted by Sacamuelas
LRD-
Pm back at ya. BTW- why not post a new thread about Seizures in this forum... everyone needs to review basic TX , Do's and Don'ts and helpful tips for the family members with epilepsy.
I'll start a thread after I hear back from Eagle5US. :cool:

Surgicalcric
04-12-2004, 19:46
Add to my list 1-ea Sawyer Snake Bite Extractor Kit.

myclearcreek
04-12-2004, 23:55
Originally posted by Surgicalcric
Nothing goes into the mouth while the patient is actively seizing, especially fingers or even afterwards while he/she is postictal. Supportive care only means moving everything from around the pateint that they may come in contact with. It is best just to let them shake and shimmy until it ends as long as there is nothing impeding there movement ie: furniture. [/B]

I learned this after having a college student seize on me during his final exam, which I was proctoring. There were 100 students and he was on the second row in seating that was bolted to the floor and close together. With the assistance of the strongest-looking guy in the class, we moved him to the floor one row down while I sent the TA to call 911. His friends in the class said he had no history of seizures that they were aware of. He confirmed that to me two days later. I had the class continue their exam, while I sat with him to make sure his head didn't hit the bottom concrete riser, but otherwise, just monitored visually for continued breathing.

Sten
06-23-2006, 13:14
Is a "Purell" type hand sanitizer worth including in a FAK?

x SF med
06-23-2006, 13:27
Is a "Purell" type hand sanitizer worth including in a FAK?

Sten-
it is a good idea to keep one of the watrerless hand sanitizers in the FAK, not as good as surgical soap, brush and water, but better than a stream or sand if you are in an area that is arid and you'r low on potable water.