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Sacamuelas
04-07-2004, 10:43
Since the TS's thread seems slightly hijacked onto nasty and smelly food items, I thought this thread might be needed.

What is the nastiest, ugliest, smelliest, weirdest, most gross thing that you have eaten or seen eaten. Then please comment as to whether it was actually good or not. :munchin

mcd72085
04-07-2004, 10:46
Cooked cow ears, covered in some type of Cambodian bbq sauce was one of the more disgusting *sounding* things I've ever eaten.....but it tasted great.

Team Sergeant
04-07-2004, 10:48
Nasty, goat from the middle east.

wierd:

Monkey, Cobra, Kudamundi, Rattlesnake

Jimbo
04-07-2004, 11:34
Steamed dog dumplings in Mongolia.

D9
04-07-2004, 11:37
1993, USMC, SgtMajor invited a handful of NCOs over to his house for dinner where his wife served a very undercooked, large slab of beef liver. It scarred me for life.

DunbarFC
04-07-2004, 11:51
Vegemite

Smells just about like it tastes

Roguish Lawyer
04-07-2004, 12:02
Rattlesnake -- tastes like chicken
Fish eyes - helps your vision, hard to chew
Curried fish jaw - so hot it was good
Durian - foul fruit smells for days, but I like it
Ants - did not care for them
Crickets - did not care for them
Spam - nasty stuff

brownapple
04-07-2004, 12:06
Waterbugs... scorpions... centipedes...

CommoGeek
04-07-2004, 12:26
Bull testicle, didn't taste bad, though.... just the thought of it.

QRQ 30
04-07-2004, 13:33
In Thailand some people had a noisy mutt. A friend of mine couldn't sleep at night and politely asked them if they would control their dog. They ignored him.

One night he invited the neighbors over for diner. They said the diner was sure good and asked what it was.

"Your dog!", he replied.

Solid
04-07-2004, 13:41
Marmite. Blackish/brown foul-smelling spread. Tastes wonderful if used sparingly on toasted full-grain bread and butter. SPARINGLY! I've seen confused countrymen spread it like peanut butter and then complain about how it tasted. :confused:

Wolf. Tasted like... well, I can't really describe it. It was good with some marinade. The off-putting thing was that the head was sitting just across the room from where we were eating, it seemed as if it was watching us.

Steak Tartar. Raw minced steak mixed with egg. It's a delicacy and looks and smells great, is eaten on toast. In moderation, it's excellent, but where I ate it they served large portions and I was not disposed to insulting the people I was eating with by not finishing. I was served just over a pound of it. Halfway through I felt ill. Afterwards, I had to puke. Safe to say now I stay the hell away from it!

Foie Gras. Goose liver pate. Many people are put off by the smell of it, and depending on how it's cooked it can look absolutely disgusting, like a loaf of alien flesh. However, when on some warm brioche or in a salad with truffles, it's superb.

Solid

The Reaper
04-07-2004, 14:08
Growing up on my Grandparent's farm, chitlins, hog brains and eggs, fish roe and eggs, tripe, scrapple.

Grub worms during survival training.

Haggus.

The absolute worst?

Balut, hands down.

TR

Solid
04-07-2004, 14:12
Haggus is fairly nasty stuff.
What do grub worms taste like and did you prepare them, or just gulp 'em down?

Thank you,

Solid

NousDefionsDoc
04-07-2004, 15:27
Ants - Roycroft has had them I know. Very good.

Just had Haggis at Burns night this year - not bad, but I wouldn't make a meal of it. More of an appetizer.

Hogshead cheese - very good with beer and crackers, especially with a hangover

Posssum - bad juju.

Raccoon - requires proper preparation

Grubs and other assorted protein - Survival phase Mmmm

Snake - Rattler I like, boa not so much

Monkey on a stick - Mmm

Iguana - Mmmm

Cow Udder - Roycroft?

Dove and Quail - good

Crow and Pigeon - not so good.

SPAM - doesn't belong in the thread. Delicacy.

NousDefionsDoc
04-07-2004, 15:27
What's Balut?

CommoGeek
04-07-2004, 15:33
Balut:
http://www.asiacuisine.com.sg/Nacws/1998/9/314/

"The wayward nature of the itik (native Filipino duck) must be the reason for an unusual Filipino delicacy - balut - a fertilised egg with a partially developed duckling, which is eaten boiled. Balut is a very nutritious snack food, which most Filipinos appreciate. However, non-Filipinos generally take a bit of convincing before taking their first bite."

It was on Fear Factor once.

Roguish Lawyer
04-07-2004, 15:37
Originally posted by CommoGeek
Balut:
http://www.asiacuisine.com.sg/Nacws/1998/9/314/

"The wayward nature of the itik (native Filipino duck) must be the reason for an unusual Filipino delicacy - balut - a fertilised egg with a partially developed duckling, which is eaten boiled. Balut is a very nutritious snack food, which most Filipinos appreciate. However, non-Filipinos generally take a bit of convincing before taking their first bite."

It was on Fear Factor once.

Out-googled me. Bastard! I was going to post the same thing.

Para
04-07-2004, 15:48
1000 year old egg. First was the smell, then I saw what it looked like. The Chinese in my office tried to explain it was a delicacy, but delicacy or not, that smell was not going to get it close to my mouth.

DunbarFC
04-07-2004, 15:50
Originally posted by Roguish Lawyer
Out-googled me. Bastard! I was going to post the same thing.

It's like Johnny Ringo vs Doc Holliday !


I forgot one - GRITS

CommoGeek
04-07-2004, 15:55
Originally posted by Roguish Lawyer
Out-googled me. Bastard! I was going to post the same thing.

My dragon style is strong....

LOL.

Dunbar: Grits? Low blow, man. Low blow. You weren't eating them right.

QRQ 30
04-07-2004, 16:01
Originally posted by NousDefionsDoc
What's Balut?

A delicassy of the Philli9pines. Fertile eggs buried in warm sand to rot and ferment. In Vietnam they are called "100 day eggs".

In Thailand I was offered a roasted monitor lizard at a graduation party at the end of the final FTX for RTASF students. I popped it in my mouth remembering the training I had received concerning insulting local customs. As it turned out I was only supposed to suck the meat off of the legs. It didn't bother me much. I guess that was the reason for the warm cobra blood and mekong.

Sacamuelas
04-07-2004, 16:06
Originally posted by DunbarFC
It's like Johnny Ringo vs Doc Holliday !


I forgot one - GRITS


Listen here Yankee boy... back off the grits!!!

That is momma's good cookin'. It is a delicacy like SPAM... Off limits in this here thread. :D

Air.177
04-07-2004, 16:21
Originally posted by Sacamuelas
Listen here Yankee boy... back off the grits!!!

That is momma's good cookin'. It is a delicacy like SPAM... Off limits in this here thread. :D

You beat me to it. I take great pleasure in asking servers in non Grits Friendly areas for a plate full just to hear how they respond. "Grits? What the hell is a grit?"

Roguish Lawyer
04-07-2004, 16:34
I'm your huckleberry.

What the hell is a grit? :D

I really don't know. Always thought it was some sort of oatmeal-like stuff.

NousDefionsDoc
04-07-2004, 16:36
Originally posted by Roguish Lawyer
I'm your huckleberry.

What the hell is a grit? :D

I really don't know. Always thought it was some sort of oatmeal-like stuff.

OMG! Who trained you?

Sacamuelas
04-07-2004, 16:44
Originally posted by Roguish Lawyer
I'm your huckleberry.
What the hell is a grit?


Nevermind... I checked the map and you are justified in the fact that you have no friggin clue!!! :p Where to start with your indoctrination...

Air.177
04-07-2004, 16:55
Grits are small broken grains of corn. They were first produced by Native Americans centuries ago. They made both "corn" grits and "hominy" grits.
Falls Mill produces "corn" grits.
Corn Grits
Falls Mill mills locally grown whole white hybrid corn. The corn is dried to a 14% moisture content, then each kernel is cleaned with forced air. The kernels of grain are run through the mill stone where they are ground to a certain texture and then sifted through two wire mesh screens. The three products sorted are white corn meal, white corn grits and the bran that pops off. There is a fine bran still in the grits product. This bran will never soften up with cooking. Depending on personal preference, the bran can be left in or removed by rinsing the grits before cooking. Yummy!

Hominy is made from field corn that is soaked in lye water (potash water in the old days) and stirred over the next day or two until the entire shell or bran comes loose and rises to the top. The kernel itself swells to twice its original size. After the remaining kernels have been rinsed several times, they are spread to dry either on cloth or screen dryers.

Roguish Lawyer
04-07-2004, 16:57
Originally posted by Air.177
Grits are small broken grains of corn. They were first produced by Native Americans centuries ago. They made both "corn" grits and "hominy" grits.
Falls Mill produces "corn" grits.
Corn Grits
Falls Mill mills locally grown whole white hybrid corn. The corn is dried to a 14% moisture content, then each kernel is cleaned with forced air. The kernels of grain are run through the mill stone where they are ground to a certain texture and then sifted through two wire mesh screens. The three products sorted are white corn meal, white corn grits and the bran that pops off. There is a fine bran still in the grits product. This bran will never soften up with cooking. Depending on personal preference, the bran can be left in or removed by rinsing the grits before cooking. Yummy!

Hominy is made from field corn that is soaked in lye water (potash water in the old days) and stirred over the next day or two until the entire shell or bran comes loose and rises to the top. The kernel itself swells to twice its original size. After the remaining kernels have been rinsed several times, they are spread to dry either on cloth or screen dryers.

Thanks, Air.

Now, clowns, tell me how this isn't kind of like oatmeal.

D9
04-07-2004, 17:00
Originally posted by Roguish Lawyer
Now, clowns, tell me how this isn't kind of like oatmeal.

I'm no botanist, but I'm pretty sure that corn is not an oat.:D

Grits are delicious. Butter and brown sugar, cheese and black pepper, you name it - deeeeeelicious.

Solid
04-07-2004, 17:03
Mhhh southern food.

Sacamuelas
04-07-2004, 17:05
Originally posted by Roguish Lawyer
Thanks, Air.

What? You didn't like my visual aid I made for you. LOL
No respect....No respect... :boohoo

Air.177
04-07-2004, 17:31
I can Google too:D

D9 is right though, They are kinda like Wallpaper paste if you don't doctor them up right

lrd
04-07-2004, 18:28
Originally posted by D9
I'm no botanist, but I'm pretty sure that corn is not an oat.

Grits are delicious. Butter and brown sugar, cheese and black pepper, you name it - deeeeeelicious. BROWN SUGAR!?! Ack. Butter, salt and pepper. That's it. :p

Roguish Lawyer
04-07-2004, 18:38
One thing I did know about grits is that you people can never agree on the "proper" way to eat them. :rolleyes: LOL

lrd
04-07-2004, 18:38
I forgot. The nastiest stuff I've ever had is natto. My youngest son loved it, but the rest of us (and most of my Japanese students) hated it. Natto is a foul-smelling sticky web of fermented soybeans typically served with a Japanese breakfast. The smell will make you crazy, and the food will make you strong. That's that the Japanese believe. It's like the Japanese vegemite perhaps, or gizzards - some food noxious to foreigners (and many locals) that natives get a kick of brandishing about. "Real Japanese eat Natto" or "Natto is real Japanese food" I've heard from a bus driver, and various people eating alongside me in rural restaurants.I didn't like it, but I tried it.

Gypsy
04-07-2004, 19:25
So far I'd say Tripe. Smells to high heaven too. ~shuddering~ When I was a young girl my grandmother fixed it every Sunday for my uncle along with pasta, meatballs, sausage and gravy for the rest of us. She made me try it once, I got sick right there....and that was the end of that.

Roguish Lawyer
04-07-2004, 19:28
The natto reminds me that I've had blowfish. It was good, but not all it's cracked up to be. I very much enjoy sea urchin roe with quail egg too.

The Reaper
04-07-2004, 19:54
Originally posted by Roguish Lawyer
I'm your huckleberry.

What the hell is a grit? :D

I really don't know. Always thought it was some sort of oatmeal-like stuff.

A lawyer, who has not seen "My Cousin Vinnie"?

Are you truly a member of the Bar, Sir?

TR

Roguish Lawyer
04-07-2004, 20:06
Originally posted by The Reaper
A lawyer, who has not seen "My Cousin Vinnie"?

Are you truly a member of the Bar, Sir?

TR

I take it from the question that you've seen all the Rambo movies, right? LOL

Vinny: Uh, do you remember what you had?

Town Person: Eggs and grits.

Vinny: Eggs and grits. I like grits too. How do you cook your grits? Do you like them regular, creamy, or al dente?

Town Person: Just regular, I guess.

Vinny: Regular.....instant grits?

Town Person: No self-respectin' Southerner uses instant grits. I take pride in my grits.

Actually, I didn't remember anything about grits in the film, and still don't recall. But these are classic:

http://funwavs.com/wavfile.php?quote=1684&sound=97

http://funwavs.com/wavfile.php?quote=1694&sound=97

Great film.

The Reaper
04-07-2004, 21:04
"Are we to believe that boiling water soaks into a grit faster in your kitchen than in any other place on the face of the earth?

Or perhaps the laws of physics cease to exist on your stove?

Were they magic grits?"

TR

FullGallop
04-07-2004, 21:28
Hákarl- Icelandic snack. It is shark that is buried for many months in volcanic sand and then hung outside to dry a bit. It´s then cubed up and eaten off of a toothpick like a cheese cube. It can best be described as tasting like fermented roadkill soaked in ammonia. Best followed by a shot(s) of BrennevÃ_n........or black death as it is known.:eek:

Puffin-Icelanders eat their national bird. LOL! It´s a red meat bird and I had it boiled. Nasty! Tastes like something rubber.

Smoked sheeps head- Pretty good really but the eyeballs were a bit more than I could take.

Sheeps testicles fermented in sour whey! As nasty as the first entry!

eyes
04-08-2004, 08:33
.............

DoctorDoom
04-08-2004, 09:02
x

DunbarFC
04-08-2004, 09:09
Let me guess.....you specialize in gastrointestinal issues ? ;)


Originally posted by DoctorDoom
Add some soy sauce to it, best thing you ever had, especially with instant noodles.

Various kinds of fermented tofu. Delicious.

Camel. Stringy. Not so good.

Pig ears. Excellent.

Sea cucumber. Properly prepared, fabulous. Otherwise, revolting.

Brain. Disgusting.

Snake, ostrich, aligator. Pretty good.

Jellyfish. Only good if my mom makes it.

Chicken feet. Just the thought grosses me out.

I have heard of hakarl. Always wanted to try it... the ammonia taste comes from the high urea content of the shark meat itself.

DoctorDoom
04-08-2004, 09:11
x

Roguish Lawyer
04-08-2004, 09:25
What's wrong with Ostrich? Great stuff!

D9
04-08-2004, 09:56
Originally posted by The Reaper
"Are we to believe that boiling water soaks into a grit faster in your kitchen than in any other place on the face of the earth?

Or perhaps the laws of physics cease to exist on your stove?

Were they magic grits?"

TR

"Did you get your grits from the same guy who sold Jack his beanstalk beans?"

LOL

DoctorDoom
04-08-2004, 10:02
x

Bill Harsey
04-08-2004, 10:14
First, Grits are good. Worst thing I think I've ever had: I grew up logging here in Oregon, paid my way thru school doing same. During one spring social event with some visiting football players from southern California, someone told them I was a logger. They asked "what made loggers so special". They'd been drinking and smoking using a shot glass for the ashtray. I might have been drinking too but don't smoke. I poured tequila right over the top of everything in the ashtray/shotglass and drank it down. No more questions about logging.

DunbarFC
04-08-2004, 12:04
I liked ostrich

Wasn't bad at all

I see I am now a "GRITS HATER"

I wonder who did that............:D

QRQ 30
04-08-2004, 12:13
Grits are like rice. They're as good or as bad as what you put on or in them!!

OTOH Hominy sucks!!!

Bill Harsey
04-08-2004, 12:55
TR, What's in hominy?

QRQ 30
04-08-2004, 13:22
Originally posted by Bill Harsey
TR, What's in hominy?

Hulled and dried kernels of corn, prepared as food by boiling, usually in lye water. It is the source of grits.

The Reaper
04-08-2004, 14:10
Originally posted by Bill Harsey
TR, What's in hominy?

Same contents, processed differently (as noted).

TR

Bill Harsey
04-08-2004, 18:07
I'll have to try some hominy again, wasn't at all bad last time. Yes I wrote about the dumbest thing I've ever drank. sorry, that was off topic. I'll go back to the knife shop now.

Sacamuelas
04-08-2004, 18:12
Originally posted by Bill Harsey
Yes I wrote about the dumbest thing I've ever drank. sorry, that was off topic. I'll go back to the knife shop now.

Well, from the sound of things, you had to chew a little to get it down and it was definitely nasty, gross, and smelly.

Anyway, its impossible to hijack a thread that was started as a hijacked thread offshoot to begin with. :cool:

Bill Harsey
04-08-2004, 18:19
I'm even most proud that I did that way before meeting Reaper. Yes chewing was involved.

echoes
04-09-2004, 15:51
There is a fantastic sushi place in Solana Beach, CA, that I frequented often while living there. I always went with a comapnay of folks who ordered the "chef's special roll", which was not on the menu.

Up until one visit, it had always been a "cooked" roll...but I will never forget ingesting the roll on that occasion. It was called smelt, (uncooked fish eggs), NOT caviar, to say the least.
Never have I been sicker... :(

Holly

Roguish Lawyer
04-09-2004, 16:05
Originally posted by echoes
It was called smelt, (uncooked fish eggs), NOT caviar, to say the least.

Bite your tongue! Masago, ummmmmmmmmmm, good!

echoes
04-09-2004, 16:10
Originally posted by Roguish Lawyer
Bite your tongue! Masago, ummmmmmmmmmm, good!

Sir, I must respectfully say NEVER!!!! :confused:

To this day, it turns my stomach.
(Like people who once were violently ill drinking Tequilla...they just can't drink it, the smell alone drives them away.

I guess, to each his own.
Holly

Roycroft201
04-09-2004, 16:20
If someone offered me 'smelt', I would have thought it was a little fish (silver in color).

Roycroft 201
(living in the Great Lakes area)

Air.177
04-09-2004, 16:24
If memory serves me, I believe that Masago is smelt eggs

echoes
04-09-2004, 16:28
Air.177
"If memory serves me, I believe that Masago is smelt eggs"

Well, since this is the "nastiest food" thread, I just thought I would give my little opinion. For me, it is a no-go!

Honestly, I think I would be Ill if I was subjected to most of the foods listed in the thread so far. I am just an old-fashioned simple girl, who enjoys home-cooked southern cooking!

(and making cherry pies...)

Holly :)

Air.177
04-09-2004, 16:49
I had some stuff one time that I think was called Eel rice. It was a little crockware pot that had some terrible smelling eel based substance mixed with rice inside. Of course, the friend who suggested such a choice neglected to tell me what it was, he just said here, try this. I also had a Chinese dish that had whole squid in it that still had beaks in them and I bit down on one.

echoes
04-09-2004, 17:05
Well, IMO, eel is wonderful...only saltwater variety, but...to each his own, right? :)

Hollly

pulque
04-09-2004, 17:23
Originally posted by D9 I'm no botanist, but I'm pretty sure that corn is not an oat.

I am a botanist. Corns and oats belong to the same plant family (grasses) and have been succesfully cross-hybridized.

My good friends in Texas wouldn't let me get by without trying grits. Mmmmm.

:D

DoctorDoom
04-09-2004, 23:45
x

Ockham's Razor
04-10-2004, 12:06
Steak Tartar.... mmmmmmm raw meat.

The Mad Cow says "Moooooooooooo"

Perhaps the most vile concoction ever passed off as "Haute Cuisine".

Air.177
04-10-2004, 12:38
Originally posted by DoctorDoom
Mmmmmmm... squid...
No problem with squid, just beaks

Ghostrider
04-14-2004, 19:58
Originally posted by The Reaper

Balut, hands down.

TR [/B]

Concur.....but of course, given the fact that I agree with NDD that SPAM shouldn't be on this list, what do I know??;)

DoctorDoom
04-14-2004, 21:45
x

Key West
04-15-2004, 23:21
Parrot Fish and Trigger Fish in the interior mountains of Jamaica.
It wasn't the taste but rather the chance of ciquatera not to mention that while in Jamaica I never saw so much as a single ice cube used to keep fish that made the meal just a tad unpalatable.
I hadn't eaten for two days so I went for it.
Oh yeah, Scorpion really sucks.

Key West
04-15-2004, 23:28
Originally posted by DoctorDoom
Sea cucumber anyone? mmmm good.

Repulsive...Umm yep, that's about all I can say on that one!

CrashBurnRepeat
04-16-2004, 15:24
Originally posted by Air.177
I had some stuff one time that I think was called Eel rice. It was a little crockware pot that had some terrible smelling eel based substance mixed with rice inside. Of course, the friend who suggested such a choice neglected to tell me what it was, he just said here, try this. I also had a Chinese dish that had whole squid in it that still had beaks in them and I bit down on one.


Air.177 is right, Eel rice is NASTY. It's usually got some sort of congealed eal leavin's in it too.

Worst thing I ate was a baitfish called a Sarkia. They look just like bala sharks you keep in your aquarium. The roll them up and cook them with a little water. When the fins start popping up they are done.

They're oily, bony as hell, don't taste very good and they've got these mutant scales that are the size of a dime. Those little scales get on EVERYTHING, and they're sticky to boot. I was picking fish scales out of my teeth for three days. YUCK.

I've had boiled goat that I swear died of natural causes. That was horrible. I've had salamander and that was fine. Goats head cheese in iceland is also not too bad.

Haggis I don't mind at all.

Spartan359
02-06-2005, 02:37
I'm curious to know what's the strangest food you gentlemen/ladies have ever eaten? :munchin For me personally it's the following:

1. Live octopus- Japan
2. Cobra Hearts- Singapore
3. Tarantula- Hong Kong

magician
02-06-2005, 03:20
People eat insects here in Thailand, I see trays of them in the markets when I walk through.

No, I have not tried them. I have been told that they are delicious, but...I hate insects. No freakin' way I will eat them, unless it is a dire, dire situation.

alphamale
02-06-2005, 03:48
The things in the pic. Dough-like on outside, strange tasting things on inside. I guess like dim sum, only very different. I tried to keep my face from scrunching up to not seem rude.

FrontSight

Spartan359
02-06-2005, 05:40
The things in the pic. Dough-like on outside, strange tasting things on inside. I guess like dim sum, only very different. I tried to keep my face from scrunching up to not seem rude.

FrontSight

They have food like that here in Japan. I don't really know the name for it. I agree with the taste. But the smell is something I won't forget. Smells like a wet dog on fire. If you can imagine that. As far as bugs go, I agree with Magician. But with the size of that damn spider I don't consider it a bug. The worst part about eating the tarantula was that it tried to eat me back! :eek:

Bill Joyner
02-07-2005, 14:58
A burned goats head on a bed of rice in Kenya.

CPTAUSRET
02-07-2005, 15:03
A burned goats head on a bed of rice in Kenya.

The scary part here is the chance of getting Scrapie/BSE!!

That scares me!

Terry

Team Sergeant
02-07-2005, 15:13
just off the top of my head...

Cobra blood, Thailand

monkey, kudimundi Panama

Raw goat, balut, cobra PI

I thought we did this before?

Roguish Lawyer
02-07-2005, 15:18
I thought we did this before?

Yep.

http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1260

Roguish Lawyer
02-07-2005, 15:20
Yep.

http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1260

In fact, I'm going to merge them.

Bill Joyner
02-07-2005, 15:21
just off the top of my head...

Cobra blood, Thailand




How does one prepare cobra blood?

Pete
02-07-2005, 15:27
Bill wrote - A burned goats head on a bed of rice in Kenya.

Damn Bill,
That sounds like one of my trips to that wonderful place. I was riding in a land rover after dark and the driver kicked up a herd of Dik-dik, a dog size antelope. He started chasing one of them in the rover and knocked it down. He jumped out, cut it's throat and tosed it in the back.

When we got to the place we were going to RON he gutted and cleaned it and threw most of it in the back to give to the officers when we got back to the camp area. He built a fire and put the head in it upside down. When the head was cooked enough for him he pulled it out of the fire and ripped the jaw off, cracked around some to get to the brain and then offered to share with me. Very interesting.

Later that night the two of us were sleeping on our ruck sacks against the rover when I was jolted out of sleep by load growling and snarling. It was just some wild dogs from the local area after the gut pile. Since I was wide awake I thought I'd just make a small fire and drink coffee until sunrise.

Pete

CPTAUSRET
02-07-2005, 15:41
The scary part here is the chance of getting Scrapie/BSE!!

That scares me!

Terry

Quoting myself. Read the link below, and you may give up eating brains.

Terry

http://www.mentorcorp.com/pelvic-organ-prolapse/prion_history.htm

bberkley
02-07-2005, 15:55
My ex-wife made a casserole from a recipe she found in some vegetarian cookbook. It had sunflower seeds, spinach, and brown rice amongst other things in it. It was hands-down, the worst thing I ever tried to eat in my life. The second worst items were pancakes made with Spelt flour. My dad was into this "Eat Right for Your Type" diet, and would only eat certain things specified for his blood type.

The dog ate the casserole out of the trash but wouldn't touch the "speltcakes". Of course he promptly barfed said casserole all over our apartment. This canine would eat cat turds out of a litter box and not get sick.

QRQ 30
02-07-2005, 16:08
More humourous than gross but bberkley's post reminded me.

When we came to the States Panee actually learned to cook american food from watching TV. At the time there was a Wesson Oil ad running on TV. They sliced bread and deep fried it in Wesson oil to show it didn't saturate the bread.

Yep! She did. I didn't want to hurt her feelings so I never said anything about it for years.

frostfire
02-07-2005, 16:43
People eat insects here in Thailand, I see trays of them in the markets when I walk through.

No, I have not tried them. I have been told that they are delicious, but...I hate insects. No freakin' way I will eat them, unless it is a dire, dire situation.
are those flying thermite, by any chance?
The locals where I come from would gather thousands of them before (or after, can't remember) the monsoon from every light source, place them in a bowl of water, then stir-fry them. Looked like a pile of flies or black-n-white fried rice from a distance.


How does one prepare cobra blood?

I don't know how they do it there, but back when I grew up, they just cut the head, drain the blood, and mix it with local liquor. The night guards would mix it with beer and sometimes egg to keep them sharp through the night.
Some info from a US businessman:
http://www.fabuloustravel.com/gourmet/travel/cobrasblood/cobra.html

I won't call the nastiest thing I ate nasty at all, it did look nasty and non-apetizing but it tasted great (+ the warm sensation); snake and monitor cuisine, fried, baked, etc....and no, they didn't taste like chicken, I'd say better, although too many bones with the snake like freshwater milkfish.

As for balut, if it's the same thing with geese egg that failed to hatch and then kept for days until it lets out sordid odor, that is indeed nasty.

Bravo1-3
02-07-2005, 17:00
The nastiest thing I've ever eaten is Cuttlefish Fafaru.

I did an exchange trip with RIMAP (Régiment d'Infanterie de Marine du Pacifique (Polynésie)) in 1992. Fafaru is nasty, even when you make it with good fish, but making it with Cuttlefish is about the only way you could make it worse.

Basically, they take a dead fish that they find on the beach, chop it up without cleaning/gutting it, and add it to a bucket of clean salt water for about 3-5 days. They just let it sit there on the beach. Then they dump it through a strainer and recollect all of the water.

That water goes in a bottle for about a month. That's the "marinade". Then once you've got some fresh, cleaned, sliced fish, you pour this bottle of death by projectile defecation on to it.

But that's not quite how you prep cuttlefish in Tahiti. You don't just slice it up like sashimi. That isn't vile enough. You have to find a nice flat piece of dry beach sand. and bury it in a hole about 4" deep covered in... of course... salt water and some kind of pepper for a few days.

Then you rinse off the sand (as much as you can rinse off) and let it sit overnight in a vat of the above marinade.

Then you give it to the foreign troops you are cross-training with, and tell them that it is a local favorite. It will make you crap fire AND water at the same time, and you can try for distance while you're at it.

The runner up (and we're talking a very distant 2nd place) is this stuff that I drank in Japan while waiting for the Rappongi Train Station to open up at 0500. Most everyone here is familiar with the wide variety of unique items you can get from vending machines in Japan (understatement).

As I am sitting there waiting for them to open the gate to head back to Yokosuka, a young L/Cpl in my platoon is busy dropping about $500 in change into one of these machines. He walks up to me with a room temperature can... white, small red stripes, red lettering in Japanese. It has a picture of what I took to be a coffee bean with little vapors coming off of it that turned into exclamation points. I'm thinking coffee.

It didn't smell like coffee, but it didn't smell bad either.

I take a sip... big mistake.

It was some kind of "nicotine drink"... in a country where people smoke a cigarette before they smoke a cigarette, they have nicotine drinks. It made my tongue numb while simultaneously causing my gums and lips to burn, and making my nose run.

I have never actually tasted a dead camels asshole, but I'd imagine this stuff is probably what you'd use to kill the aftertaste. It tasted like nothing that I could describe. I spat it out almost instantly... all over the kid who had given it to me. Serves him right. Incidentally, it destroyed the shirt I was wearing too.

Jo Sul
02-07-2005, 17:01
The unidentifiable crap they fed me in China - made me sick for a week. Oh yeah, the pickled chicken feet were pretty nasty too.

QRQ 30
02-07-2005, 18:12
Had cobra blood at a Thai SF graduation party in Kanchunaburi. It was just as Magician described. He may have forgotten that the Mekong (local liquor) was hot and packed a real wallop. :D

At the same party they served monitor lizard. I popped mine into my mouth and ate it. I saw the looks on the Thai's faces and realized I was just supposed to pull off the legs and eat them. :o

Probably the grossest was walking through the markets. Various soups and curries were cooked in those square 3 gal. tin buckets. They were covered with flies and looked gross but actually were pretty good.

On the trains, venders went up and down the isles selling roasted canaries.

TerribleTobyt
02-07-2005, 22:11
"More friends of TerribleTobyT"

"This is a pic of ODA-563 as it was configured Oct 75, during a JTX in Iran, near the mountain village of Qom.

"USSF personnel-SFC Charles (Hawkeye) Thomas, SSG Toby Todd, SFC Bob Bunnell, CPT Ricard Seim (MI, TL), SFC Cecil Ames, MSG Alex Kalognomous (Tm Sgt).

"Kneeling are two squared-away Iranian SF NCOs.

"I've often wondered how they made out after the Fall of the Shah."
Attached Thumbnails

Shortly before this pic was taken, two lambs were slaughtered, gutted and put onna spit over an open fire. Before the spit had made two full turns, the Iranian SF soldiers had their version of K-Barsout and were cutting slabs of meat offa the still cold carcasses. And offering them to us'ns!!!

We drank copious beer and cognac to wash that stuff down!!!!!

Toby

Ooops, need someone's hep posting the pic that went with this!!!!!! :D


edit to add...there ya' go

Sacamuelas
02-07-2005, 22:30
PM inbound TobyT

Maas
02-07-2005, 22:36
I forgot. The nastiest stuff I've ever had is natto. My youngest son loved it, but the rest of us (and most of my Japanese students) hated it. I didn't like it, but I tried it.

That stuff is nasty. Even the Japanese I worked with didn't eat it. But every year it would show up. It's something they pass off on others. Kinda like we do with fruitcake.

SPAM .. :D Little Mayo, slice of cheese, what a sandwich.

Grits, hate 'em. Not all Southern boys like them. Why eat that when you can have a plate of eggs over medium, bacon, cat head biscuits all smothered in milk gravy and a big ole glass of milk.

magician
02-08-2005, 02:32
Joe K needs to jump in here. The last time that I saw him, he had some wicked pics of enormous insects that he had encountered in Cambodia...or was it Laos....maybe it was Burma. I forget. Does not matter. Bottom line: he took the photographs, and then showed the .... specimens to the villagers he had hired to help him.... so that they could eat them. Those people ate everything.

I was damaged by the photographs. Just knowing that other humans had consumed those creatures scarred me. Just knowing that those creatures existed....aside from my nightmares.....was bad enough. National Geographic has got NOTHING on Joe K.

Here is a photo of a guy's lunch. When I had an office at BIAP, the guys who screened everyone coming into the country used to come and hang out, periodically. I had coffee, and my secretary was hot. Guy can tell you about her. Anyway, one day, they saw this on the monitor as they were screening bags.

It turns out, a guy really liked goat head. So he wrapped one up, and he stuck it in his luggage, and he brought it with him so he could eat it later.

It was one of those things that you would never believe unless you saw the photo.

:)

Roguish Lawyer
02-08-2005, 10:52
It was one of those things that you would never believe unless you saw the photo.

Yep. Looks tough to photoshop that too, although I suppose it is possible.

CPTAUSRET
02-08-2005, 12:06
While going through a survival school (1965), I learned a great many things, rabbits, snakes, white grub worms, etc, etc, will keep you alive.

During the grub eating phase we were all given the choice of eating a large white grub which had little hooks on its legs. Some of the guys had trouble swallowing them as they would attempt to hang on with the aforementioned hooks, the choice was to have one's grub cooked to order. I was the smart ass who volunteered to have mine cooked, the look on the instructor's face was priceless, and I knew immediately that I had stepped on my peepee.

My grub was cooked in the same rancid grease that had been there since the original class, I presume that once in awhile they would additional grease to the pot. It was the worst tasting thing I had ever experienced, I tried desperately not to get sick, to no avail! I was the only one to get sick!

LESSON LEARNED!!

Terry

magician
02-09-2005, 00:19
Yep. Looks tough to photoshop that too, although I suppose it is possible.

I was in the airport the day that the screeners all went apeshit laughing their asses off over this.

TerribleTobyt
02-09-2005, 10:24
Speakin of screeners-I did that for a short time in the early '90s here in San Antone International.

Y'all should see how somma the sex toys show up on the color xray m'chine!!!!!

:eek: :D

Now back to the nasty shit to eat!!!!!!! :rolleyes:

mumbleypeg
02-09-2005, 12:29
If you make camp with bedouins the way they welcome you is with warm goat milk. I realize this is a drink in a food thread, but it tasted like shaved goat ass and turds and looked just like it. I had to smile and say "thanks for the hospitality you area kind and gracious host" all before I had a massive evacuation.

Rotor Strike
02-10-2005, 19:36
Damn, I think I might just have you all topped. Ufu is the American Indian word for the partially digested food remaining inside the stomach of a rabbit. Had to eat it at Survival school. It litterally is about half an inch from being shit. It has the consistency of copenhagen fine cut, but more tacky, and tastes like...well, shit. Worst damn thing I've ever seen, smelled, or eaten.

TerribleTobyt
02-10-2005, 20:33
Damn, I think I might just have you all topped. Ufu is the American Indian word for the partially digested food remaining inside the stomach of a rabbit. Had to eat it at Survival school. It litterally is about half an inch from being shit. It has the consistency of copenhagen fine cut, but more tacky, and tastes like...well, shit. Worst damn thing I've ever seen, smelled, or eaten.

The Winnah!!!!!!!!!! :lifter

Maas
02-10-2005, 20:37
It litterally is about half an inch from being shit.

That is a great line.

LMAO

mcwalkerusa
12-25-2005, 20:53
I hope you ate them ATER they were removed from the wrapper!!! :) :)

The Reaper
12-25-2005, 21:09
I hope you ate them ATER they were removed from the wrapper!!! :) :)

mcwalker, you have failed to follow the simple instructions here.

You are about 5 minutes from the end of your time on this site.

If I were you, I would read and heed the stickies and intros, quickly.

Tempus fugit.

TR

ObliqueApproach
12-26-2005, 03:20
:D Damn, I think I might just have you all topped. Ufu is the American Indian word for the partially digested food remaining inside the stomach of a rabbit. Had to eat it at Survival school. It litterally is about half an inch from being shit. It has the consistency of copenhagen fine cut, but more tacky, and tastes like...well, shit. Worst damn thing I've ever seen, smelled, or eaten.

Until I read about Ufu:eek: , I thought the following must be the worst dish on earth, but Ryan has outdone me.:( Here was my entry anyway, just in case any of you desire to cook an authentic Arabic dish.

Ingredients:
1 X baby goat
1 X bag of course grain flower

Directions: Boil goat all day in a large 10 gallon alluminum pot until dissolved (Don't worry about the bones as they will mostly dissolve or add crunch) Pour in flour and stir until the consistency of white lithium grease.

Serving Suggestions: Serve in original 10 gallon pot, sit around on the ground with 20 other blokes, dip your right hand in and scoop out healthy portions of the miasma (don't mind the 1 inch layer of grease on the top, but do be prepared to burn your hand in it). Enjoy!:confused:

Hint: While eating remember "Hearts and minds;hearts and minds!" (And all the other organs as well!)

De Oppresso Liber

Phantom
12-26-2005, 04:39
Heh, My Cousin Vinnie.. they missed an opportunity there, but then again it's harder to make fun of us Southerners eating grits if the Italians actually had enough brains to recognize that GRITS = POLENTA.

Of course I'll take mine with a pinch of salt, a bit more pepper and a proper dose of McIlheny's Tabasco (red).

As far as weird, stomach turning, nasty looking foods.. well..

at home:

Headcheese/souse, can't stand it.

Possum, tasts like sh!t.

Squirrel, not too bad.

Rabbit, damn fine eating, especially with proper BBQ sauce.

Racoon, ok, but not as good as squirrel, and too much effort to run down, kill and dress. AND I'm not going out in the woods at night with a bunch of armed, moonshine fuelled 'hunters' ever again.

Chitlins, smell like sh!t while cooking, smell like sh!t while cooling on my plate, still smell like sh!t in the garbage where I'll dump 'em, because they taste like Possum ;) .

Pickled Pigs Feet, tastes pretty much like pickled bacon dipped in pig sh!t.

not so far away from home:

Rattlesnake, not to bad, not exactly chicken.

Rat, not to different from squirrel.

Grubs, had to try it. Kind of like stale popcorn.

Ants, had to try it. Not a fan.

Chocolate covered ants, barely even noticed they were there.

Chocolate covered grasshopper, nasty surprize inside.

Korea:

Kimchee - 'rotten' (fermented) cabbage, red pepper and vinegar, some people think is smells foul, I personally love it. Actually, there are MANY types of kimchee, this is just the one most likely to be found at an American grocery, if you have a local asian market, I'd recommend trying every kimchee they have. Almost all are universally excellent (at least as far as I'm concerned).

Dog (Rottie or Dobie) - hair singed off with blow torch, roasted over spit. Similar to squirrel, took a long while to find a place that had it, and would trust an American enough to serve it.

Dog (small unknown mutt) - in a "health stew" tasted like someone smuggled in a truckload of chitlins.

Kimchee Soup ('Rotten' Cabbage Soup) - will clean your sinuses from across the room, melt your face 5 feet from the bowl, make your eyes burn from the fumes, and singe the hair off your ass on the way out the next moring, but well worth it for those who love hot food with interesting flavors.

Hong Kong:

100 and/or 1000 'year' Tofu - AWFUL AWFUL SMELL, really rough to take unless properly 'seasoned.' Wish I had my tabasco with me.

Team Sergeant
12-26-2005, 09:37
GRITS = POLENTA.


Negative,

Thats like calling tater tots, mashed potatoes. There's a distinct taste and texture difference between the two. I'm thinking if you served a hardcore Southerner a bowl of polenta for breakfast you'd better be running for the door after he took the first bite.

TS

Polenta is a boiled, slow-cooked cornmeal "mush" -- typically made with coarsely ground yellow corn meal. In some regions of Italy (especially in the north), it's a beloved everyday dish and is topped with meat, fish, pasta sauce, cheese, or vegetables. Cooled and hardened, polenta can be sliced, sautéed, or grilled, and served sweet or savory. Or you can create a layered polenta torta, reminiscent of a lasagne.

Grits are "coarsely ground pieces of dried corn moistened into a mealy paste" that have a mythic role in Southern culinary culture. Historians suggest that grits played an important role in early Southern agriculture, providing food for the first English settlers in Jamestown, Virginia, and later helping Southerners survive the Great Depression.
http://ask.yahoo.com/20021007.html

Firebeef
12-26-2005, 16:34
For some reason, adventurous eating isn't a trait common to fire houses. Beef, potatoes and bread are revered, at least in my department. Vegetables (if you HAVE to have them) should be corn, so as not to offend any of the other firemen. (green=gross to many firemen?!?!?) I am known throughout our department as "he who will eat anything" , and it's mostly true.....except...... Herring! I was so completely grossed out when I was in the the Baltics, northern Germany, Holland, Scandanavia and all those other Herring eating countries.

I like fish....love sushi.... I CAN'T STAND HERRING!

mugwump
12-26-2005, 22:35
Most disconcerting: live octopus in Korea.

Lifelong bad karma: the live monkey brain thing in Indonesia, gack.

Sickest I've ever been: Kimchee home made by a ROK roomate in college. He was in ESL language school and was seriously jonzing for kimchee. He fermented it on top of our radiator. I prayed for death for two days - ended up in the hospital.

tonyzealotus
12-26-2005, 23:31
I may be taking this thread in a different direction, but .....

weirdest : beggin strips (like tough and chewy burned......bacon of all things:) )

fish food flakes ( like bits of newspaper soaked in dirty dishwater,
then dipped in salt)

Air.177
12-26-2005, 23:49
I may be taking this thread in a different direction, but .....

weirdest : beggin strips (like tough and chewy burned......bacon of all things:) )

fish food flakes ( like bits of newspaper soaked in dirty dishwater,
then dipped in salt)


Dude, you got it all wrong, You're supposed to feed those things to the Pets BEFORE you eat them (the pets that is)

Phantom
12-27-2005, 05:18
Accepted TS.

I should not have taken the shortcut and used "=".

However, I am compelled to beg to differ on said difference.

Grits and polenta are much closer than tater tots and mashed. Grits are common to many cultures by different names, and almost assuredly Polenta's Daddy.

I'd say more like the difference between country mashed potatoes with a lot of skin left in (grits) and creamed potatoes (polenta). Or possibly, the difference between a M1911A1 and a Colt Lightweight Commander.

Just because the Italians sissify it by screening out the little bit of 'grit' left in grits, doesn't mean it changed that much. As far as toppings and 'refined' treatment of grits, cheese grits are nothing new, and neither are grits cakes, grits 'spoonbread', fried grits, chicken and cheese grits, shrimp and grits (even if Forrest forgot them), pork chili hominy, baked garlic cheese grits, and grits casseroles with whatever you like in them. Anything that has been done with Polenta, was probably done with grits first, just "grittier", without the uppity Italian chef attitude.

Many southern wives will switch to polenta when grits get a bit uncomfortable for the old dentures. Pappy will know his gums don't take as much flak, but he won't ask, and Mammy won't tell. Momma's with grit eater family history to uphold will sometimes use the same substitution with stubborn kids till they get past being so picky.

Me? As long as I can put my hotsauce on it if it needs it, I don't care a whit.


Negative,

Thats like calling tater tots, mashed potatoes. There's a distinct taste and texture difference between the two. I'm thinking if you served a hardcore Southerner a bowl of polenta for breakfast you'd better be running for the door after he took the first bite.

TS

Polenta is a boiled, slow-cooked cornmeal "mush" -- typically made with coarsely ground yellow corn meal. In some regions of Italy (especially in the north), it's a beloved everyday dish and is topped with meat, fish, pasta sauce, cheese, or vegetables. Cooled and hardened, polenta can be sliced, sautéed, or grilled, and served sweet or savory. Or you can create a layered polenta torta, reminiscent of a lasagne.

Grits are "coarsely ground pieces of dried corn moistened into a mealy paste" that have a mythic role in Southern culinary culture. Historians suggest that grits played an important role in early Southern agriculture, providing food for the first English settlers in Jamestown, Virginia, and later helping Southerners survive the Great Depression.
http://ask.yahoo.com/20021007.html

Team Sergeant
12-27-2005, 10:11
Grits and polenta are much closer than tater tots and mashed.

It was a metaphor used to make a point, thats all.:rolleyes:

I've used polenta in recipes, and even to my under-educated palate there's a definite difference.

TS

Phantom
12-27-2005, 14:15
Hell TS, if I still lived in grits country, I'd probably drive over with a case or three of your favorite beers, a few bottles of my favorite single malt, and a couple of bags of grits and polenta to cook and compare until we were on the same wavelength.

Michelle
12-27-2005, 15:09
Balut, hands down.

TR

Dang it! That was mine! lol.

I didn't think ANYONE else would know about Balut.

Should have known Sir Reaper would.

m1

VelociMorte
12-28-2005, 08:25
While living in Japan, I tried a concoction of squid gut-sacks, raw squid chunks, and sake, that was fermented for one week. I discovered that the only thing that tastes worse than squid shit is rotten squid shit.

P.I. Balut, dryed chicken feet (the claws make great toothpicks), puppy.

The worse I've ever seen anyone else eat was in Pataya Beach....young drunk Marine...very busy girl...stage....slimey banana slices. You get the picture.

JGarcia
12-28-2005, 08:28
My mom's Tuna Casserole. Would rather swish balut around my mouth.

Team Sergeant
12-28-2005, 08:49
My mom's Tuna Casserole. Would rather swish balut around my mouth.

You know you're going to burn in Hell for that one. LOL

Bob1984
12-28-2005, 09:33
I've had raccoon. Reminded me of pork chops. all in all, though, wasn't very good.

catd11r
01-02-2006, 22:30
Possum is bad tasting to me, raccon is O.K. Bear is to greasy and stringy. Love grits , hominy and boiled peanuts. Ramps are great cooked with eggs, or eaten raw with a bologna sandwich.

Ammodawg
01-03-2006, 02:11
When I was in Okinawa I had baby frozen Octopus, pulled it from the bar, then "cooked" it on the hotplate at our table, it tasted all rubbery with a gooey middle.

Starbuck
01-03-2006, 06:37
Scrapple, spam, grits...you guys don't know what's good. I was wondering, just how hungry was the first guy to eat a balut.?

dr. mabuse
01-03-2006, 14:03
Dog ribs (past their prime) with nuoc mam (also past it's prime) and poorly prepared left-over javelina stew.....whew...can't put enough BBQ sauce/food deodorizer on that stuff. Balut (maodan) can be, em, interesting.

vsvo
01-06-2006, 15:47
Here’s a delicacy from the motherland, called tiet canh. It falls in a class of food roughly translated as “drinking food,” to be eaten with rice wine, beer, liquor, etc. It’s a big hit and a must-have when the old-timers get together to reminisce about the war and the homeland.

Take one live goose. Slit its throat and drain the blood into a pan. Refrigerate the pan and let it sit as the blood congeals into a jelly. Dress the goose and boil. Boil the goose liver as well and slice into thin strips. Lay the goose liver strips on top of the congealed blood. Sprinkle the pan with crushed peanuts and squeeze a lemon or lime all over. Scoop the jelly and liver out and slurp it right off the spoon, with the goose meat on the side.

I’ve only seen this prepared once, but have seen it served several times over the years. In 1976 we were living in Houston. We refugees were relative newcomers, so there were few grocery stores or restaurants. All the good stuff was being cooked at home. One night one of my dad’s friends invited us over for dinner. I was playing with the other kids when I heard a commotion in the kitchen. I ran in to see two geese being brought in from the back yard. They were very pretty, with bright white feathers, and these guys had found a local farm which sold them. I didn’t know what was coming, and quickly ran out of the kitchen when the geese started wailing and screaming.

Balut, wife and family love it. The nieces and nephews are being trained to eat it, they are starting out on the hard yellow yolk. I just scurry to a different area of the house until they are done.

1000 year eggs, I love it. It's delicious with congee (rice porridge) and sliced pork.

The Reaper
01-06-2006, 15:50
vsvo:

You are hereby disqualified by reason of ethnicity.:D

And you provide way too many details for the squeamish.

TR

vsvo
01-06-2006, 16:03
vsvo:

You are hereby disqualified by reason of ethnicity.:D

And you provide way too many details for the squeamish.

TR

LOL. Yes, sir. I always like to know how my food is prepared, maybe not such a good idea in this case.:D

Sacamuelas
01-06-2006, 16:11
What dumbass started this thread???? I am going to go puke now.:D LOL

DoctorDoom
01-09-2006, 01:41
x

Huey14
01-09-2006, 03:40
Can't eat possum here, too much poison in their systems. Have to watch out for rabbits and know there's no poison being used in the area you've got it from, too.

Can't say I've ever had anything out of the ordinary. There's a Wild Food festival each year down south on the West Coast, but seeing as it's A. The West Coast and B. My cousins live there, I've passed on going to it.

AMP
01-09-2006, 14:34
That was disgusting.

NousDefionsDoc
11-07-2006, 16:51
Bull testicle, didn't taste bad, though.... just the thought of it.

I missed this one somehow.
You Sir, are mistaken. They are called Prarie Oysters. They are most excellent as a snack while working. Simply whack them and throw them on the branding iron fire. Wash down with ice cold Lone Star.

I was a cowboy before Buddha Enlightened me and I got my LGH...;)

I agree, Ryan wins.

Bill Harsey
11-07-2006, 20:39
Here’s a delicacy from the motherland, called tiet canh. It falls in a class of food roughly translated as “drinking food,” to be eaten with rice wine, beer, liquor, etc. It’s a big hit and a must-have when the old-timers get together to reminisce about the war and the homeland.

Take one live goose. Slit its throat and drain the blood into a pan. Refrigerate the pan and let it sit as the blood congeals into a jelly. Dress the goose and boil. Boil the goose liver as well and slice into thin strips. Lay the goose liver strips on top of the congealed blood. Sprinkle the pan with crushed peanuts and squeeze a lemon or lime all over. Scoop the jelly and liver out and slurp it right off the spoon, with the goose meat on the side.

I’ve only seen this prepared once, but have seen it served several times over the years. In 1976 we were living in Houston. We refugees were relative newcomers, so there were few grocery stores or restaurants. All the good stuff was being cooked at home. One night one of my dad’s friends invited us over for dinner. I was playing with the other kids when I heard a commotion in the kitchen. I ran in to see two geese being brought in from the back yard. They were very pretty, with bright white feathers, and these guys had found a local farm which sold them. I didn’t know what was coming, and quickly ran out of the kitchen when the geese started wailing and screaming.

Balut, wife and family love it. The nieces and nephews are being trained to eat it, they are starting out on the hard yellow yolk. I just scurry to a different area of the house until they are done.

1000 year eggs, I love it. It's delicious with congee (rice porridge) and sliced pork.
I just came in from the shop and I'm hungry! This sounds GOOD! Now I have to go see what Ryan has to offer.

Bill Harsey
11-07-2006, 20:49
Ryan, buddy,
Thanks for taking one for the Team here. I hold the regional record for longest distance shooting an elk turd out of my nose (have witnesses) but have little desire to sample the delicacy you desribe.
Bill

vsvo
11-07-2006, 20:49
I just came in from the shop and I'm hungry! This sounds GOOD! Now I have to go see what Ryan has to offer.
LOL! Mr. Harsey, it must've been an extra hard day in the shop!

x SF med
11-08-2006, 07:41
Ok, undercooked squirrel or goat doesn't even come close to some of these. But what about jellyfish, sans tentacles.

highspeedmdd
11-08-2006, 08:58
goat eye

KFC chicken biscuit sandwich in the upper sickhouse @ MEDLAB, the old one, during records and reports

beef, diced, with gravy

incommin
11-08-2006, 08:59
Rhade cooked chicken head with rice and the crap sucked up through a bamboo straw during the partaking of their rice wine.

Jim

LibraryLady
11-08-2006, 10:16
...They are called Prarie Oysters. They are most excellent as a snack while working. Simply whack them and throw them on the branding iron fire...

Not to contradict, just to add a regional difference, they're called Rocky Mountain Oysters out here. Absolutely delicious especially when fresh as described above! Even better if they came off of a buffalo.

Nastiest I've ever eaten, puppy stew.

Ugly but delicious - baby squid, raw marinated. and buffalo tongue.

Excellent thread!

LL

kachingchingpow
11-08-2006, 10:39
I bit into a chicken salad sandwich that started foaming in my mouth one time. I purchased it off a roach coach back when I was doing construction... lets just say that the pink stuff was my friend.

One of the old-timers at my deer camp quickly scurries up the testicles off any bucks that get shot. He par-boils them, then fries em up. I'm not a big fan of the process (if you've ever cleaned and dressed them you know what I'm talking about), or the ritual. I refused to try them on GP for the longest time, but then Jack Daniels twisted my arm one night. Can't say I'll be putting them on the grocery list, but they *were* pretty tasty.

bost1751
11-08-2006, 10:51
I love mountain oysters. When I was in CO we used to have a couple of big nut fries a year. What a feast. They do have to be cleaned and prepared right though.

The nastiest, to think about anyway, was Sooya. (however it is spelled). It was bite size chunks of meat, on a skewer, cooked over a small open fire (frequently pieces of old tires mixed in with the wood). Then the street vendor wood remove it from the fire and scrape it into a piece of newspaper to wrap it up. This was in Calibar, Nigera (formerly Biafra). It tasted good, looked pretty good, but you were better off not knowing where the animal came from, what the critter was and ignore the newspaper. It was from differant animals. We all loved it, ate it frequently and went to the local bar afterwards. None of us ever had to be de-wormed. Must have been because of the burning Goodyear and sterile meat wrapping.

stakk4
11-08-2006, 10:55
Worst:
Two lobster tails that had gone bad. Ridiculous story but I finished them. Then I wished I hadn't. I also hated the only batch of rattlesnake I've ever eaten. Maybe I just got a bad portion or something but it tasted....copperish, like I had a penny in my mouth or something.

Best:
Fried gator tail is the food of the gods.
Ostrich (emu is not as good.)
I think buffalo is scrumptious, but never tried the testicles.


S

stone
11-08-2006, 11:19
I ate a Mopane worm (cooked) in Namibia and I have to be honest, I didn't care for it. I smiled as I ate it though-- didn't want to insult the people who were feeding me. If you're interested there's a picture of some Mopane worms here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Harvested_Mopanes.jpg

vsvo
11-08-2006, 11:46
Not to contradict, just to add a regional difference, they're called Rocky Mountain Oysters out here. Absolutely delicious especially when fresh as described above! Even better if they came off of a buffalo.

I remember Rocky Mountain Oysters being on the menu at The Fort (http://www.thefort.com/). I can't remember if I tried some (I probably did); I was with my project/engagement team, and the beer was flowing. I do remember the buffalo marrow bones, simply delicious. That and smoking cigars out by the teepee and fire after dinner.

bost1751
11-08-2006, 11:54
The Fort, in Morrison, CO is fantastic. The menu is great, the food is great, the only thing not so great is the bill.

LibraryLady
11-08-2006, 12:06
I remember Rocky Mountain Oysters being on the menu at The Fort (http://www.thefort.com/). I can't remember if I tried some (I probably did); I was with my project/engagement team, and the beer was flowing. I do remember the buffalo marrow bones, simply delicious. That and smoking cigars out by the teepee and fire after dinner.

Never had oysters in a restaurant. LOL

Marrow bones are awesome, you just throw 'em in the fire, and when the bones start cracking, it's a rather distinctive pop, rake 'em out of the fire, hit 'em with a hammer and then spoon out the marrow.

LL

NousDefionsDoc
11-08-2006, 18:17
Not to contradict, just to add a regional difference, they're called Rocky Mountain Oysters out here. Absolutely delicious especially when fresh as described above! Even better if they came off of a buffalo.

Nastiest I've ever eaten, puppy stew.

Ugly but delicious - baby squid, raw marinated. and buffalo tongue.

Excellent thread!

LL
Rocky Mountain Oysters do not come from bulls. Deer or elk (and now buffalo).

x SF med
11-08-2006, 20:04
Rocky Mountain Oysters do not come from bulls. Deer or elk (and now buffalo).

Well, after you're done 'harvesting' they're no longer bulls (bull elk, bull deer, bull cattle, or bull buffalo) anymore anyway. What's that old DI line, "Only 2 things come from Texas....."

dr. mabuse
11-08-2006, 22:31
Dog ribs that were past their prime in Taiwan. That was over 30 years ago and still gives me the shivers.....:eek:

bost1751
11-09-2006, 00:35
NDD you need to participate in a good size branding on some ranches in CO. You can even harvest the mountain oysters yourself and witness first hand where they come from. Its a pretty big deal out west, quite a differance from the east coast. You cut, clean em, batter em and fry em. Ad a few beers in there and it just does not get any better than that.

FearMonkey
11-09-2006, 17:19
Here's a picture of Balut moments before a good buddy of mine devoured it. I thought you were supposed to eat disgusting things in SERE, but definitely not in language school?!

I have never had the.... pleasure(?) of eating Balut, but the most disgusting concoction I've ever put into this body had to have been during Sage. Here's the recipe:

1 ea. - O'Doul's that had been sitting in the sun for 3 days
1 ea. - liquid charcoal
1 ea. - sour milk
4 ea. - raw eggs

And OF COURSE, this was their "Holy Drink" that we would offend the G's if we couldn't manage to keep it down. All we were thinking is, "If this is such a delicacy how come we're the only one's drinking it!?"